Secrets of the Single Leg Take Down or Shot

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.    I’ve covered the double leg take down and its finishes.  Now I am going to blog on the single.

Some of the secrets Clint shared with us were:

  1. Your head should always be on the inside when doing a single leg take down.  This keeps the target’s hips in check, avoids being flattened, and the Guillotine.
  2. Hips in and Head Up.  Your posture can make or break this technique.  You need to keep your hips in and your head up to get the power you need and to avoid losing control of the shot.
  3. Keep you target off balance.  Once you have the leg if you keep moving the target around until you get the position you want for the finish he won’t be able to go on the offensive.
  4. Lock the leg to you and not you to the leg.  He show how to hold the leg and at the same time be able to quickly let go or react if needed.

In the video Clint talks about how he doesn’t use the double leg take down against big guys and how the single is easier to recover from if you fail in the shot.  I will continue with posts on the finishes he showed next.

Here is the video:

Secrets To The Single Leg Take Down or Shot

Here are some of the other posts related to this seminar:

  1. Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finish Technique
  2. How to do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

 

How To Do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I posted the Hook Leg Take Down as one of the other finishing moves Clint showed us.  The other one was the Flare or Cut-Corner take down.  It was a little more difficult of the the two double leg take downs.  It involves changing your direction of attack.  In the Hook Leg take down you just keep driving forward.  With the Flare or  Cut-Corner take down you change direction half way through.  It also reminds me of the BJJ technique called Baiana.  If you combined a shot with a Baiana you would get the Flare or Cut-Corner in my opinion.  I had a hard time pushing off of my posting leg to do this technique.  I think part of it was in learning I wasn’t doing it full strength.  I needed to have the target off balance for it to work properly.  I apologize for how shaky the video is. After working out for a while and being slammed to the mat a few times it was hard keeping it still.

Here it is on YouTube.com:

 

If you can’t see it please click HERE

The Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finishing Technique

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  Clint continued the seminar with finishing techniques.  One of them was how to finish your take down or shot with the hook leg take down.  This is a finish to use after you have done your follow through.  Clint does a excellent job I think of showing how to really step thorough your target and then follow through with the momentum to get the finish.  He also shows how to continue working for the finish if you don’t get it right off.  I think most BJJ practitioners are weak in this.  I know I am.  Clint even mentions at one point how a typical BJJ guy won’t even need the finishing move if the initial shot or impact is hard enough.   In most cases the target will just fall back and try for guard.  I found it easy to do the hooking motion.  But I noticed for my partner that has more muscle then me it was harder.

I have also included the video on YouTube.com  Here it is:

Hook Leg Take Down

6 Steps Of The Shot or Take Down

Saturday I attended a Free Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu-Jitsu.  Clint went over a number of things.  I will post each day until I get them all covered.  Today’s post is about the basics of the Shot.  Here are the 6 steps or parts of a shot.  In the video I have included Clint goes over them and explains in more detail.  I will give a synopsis of each step.

  1. Distance – To make a shot you need to be a bent arms length from your target.
  2. Setup – Before making the shot you need to distract or throw off your target.  This is can be done in a number of ways.  The one noted by Clint is just to cause the person to blink by taping their head.  The Setup may also include positioning your self to get ready for the shot.
  3. Level – You should drop down to waist level as you shoot.
  4. Penetration Step – A common drill in BJJ that simulates this is called the “duck walk”.  As you shoot forward you want to moves as if going through them.  This nocks them off balance and gives you control.
  5. Follow Through – This continues the shooting motion.  If you don’t follow through all you have done is stop at their feet.  You are now in a compromised position for a sprawl or to have them take back control on you.
  6. Finish – This the the last move that takes them down.  I will be posting more then one finish we went over.  In this basic example it is simply wrapping the leg that is moving forward from the follow through around the closest leg of the target.  This of course trips them in the case of a double leg take down.

Watch the video with these things in mind and it should help you get more out of it:

If you can’t see the video click HERE to see it on YouTube.com

A Funny But Effective BJJ Technique To Get The Rear Naked Choke

You have back control and you have your hooks in.  You are trying to put a Rear Naked Choke or any choke on the guy for that matter but can’t get under his chin.  Here is a funny but effective BJJ technique that I learned from Mark Johnson at West Side Jiu-Jitsu.  Underneath your nose is a bundle of nerves.  Now the funny part, rub in a sawing motion the nerves upward with the blade of your hand.  It looks like you are scratching under their nose for them.  At first they resist and then as you increase the pressure it hurts.  The next thing you know they lift their head and you quickly slide your hand from the nose to the throat.  When I saw this I realized that they use this when they take pictures of babies.  The photographer would put her finger under my child’s nose to get her to raise her head for the photo.  I always wondered why the child would look up so easily with it.  Its not so much that it hurts at first as it is annoying.  Below is a picture of me showing the position of your hand with my Submission Master Grappling Dummy.  I know that descriptions don’t always work.

Finger-Under-Nose-Technique

The Secret to the Inescapable Guillotine

Last night I trained with the big boys.  I got creamed in every roll but man did I pick up some good stuff.  We trained on Guillotine technique.  Of all the training last night the thing that stuck out the most was how to keep some one from escaping the Guillotine.  Here are some pictures I took using my Submission Master Grappling Dummy (explanation below):

guillotine-part1

guillotine-part2

guillotine-part3

Notice how I am not using the blade of my choking arm on the neck.  This is because I will need my palm up in order to put my arm over the shoulder.   I am going to rely on the tremendous pressure I create when I sit back into a open guard to really apply the Guillotine Choke. 

If he hasn’t tapped yet I then fall back into open guard and put one foot on the dummies hip and create a wrenching motion while escaping my hips.  This is done by bring the choking elbow down and swinging it in towards the dummy.  It is kind of a “J” motion.  At the same time I push on the hip to add force.  In practice this made my neck crackle.  It is very powerful.

As you have noticed the real trick is to get that arm over the shoulder before he lifts his arm  over yours to start a escape.  With his arm blocked under yours its all but over.  The secret to the inescapable guillotine.

If you have any questions please post a comment and I will answer them as best I can.

Free Take Down Seminar From West Side Jiu Jitsu

It seems that the weakest link in most BJJ practitioners arsenal is the take down.  I have to admit that I get a little gun shy when I think of take down practice.  That is after all how I tore my MCL last year.  I was to bull headed and tried to stop my instructor from taking me down.  So when my school offered a free take down seminar this Saturday I decided it was time to get into it.  The best way to improve is to work at something that bothers you until you master it.  I don’t like take downs because I fear injuries.  I get injuries because I’m poor at it.  The good old saying “What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger” is my philosophy.  So I’m going to go to the seminar.  Any of my readers in the area are welcome to join me and meet me in person.  It will be held at 12 – 2pm on Nov. 7th at West Side Jiu Jitsu Academy (2236 Washington Blvd.) in Ogden, UT.  It is being taught by Clint “The Badger” Christensen.  Clint is well known in the area for his expertise.  I understand he fought Matt Hughes to a draw.  It should be good.  I’ll blog later about how it went and what I learned.  I might even have some videos to show.

How To Use the Submission Master Grappling Dummy To Increase Muscle Memory

I’ve had my Submission Master Grappling Dummy now for about 1 month.  I’ve been using him in a daily drill routine that I formulated.  I have to say I really like my Submission Master and last night it paid off.  I’d been work on the Triangle Choke, Arm Bar from Guard, Triangle Choke to Arm Bar, and Arm Bar from Mount.  I got 3 of the 4 last night in class.  What I really liked about my drilling with the Submission Master was that it gave me the physical feedback that helped reinforce my muscle memory.  The more repetitions I did the easier it seemed to notice my chances for a submission and connect on them.  For example I was having a hard time getting the transition from a failed Triangle Choke to a Arm Bar.  I kept putting the wrong leg under the guys chin.  After doing reps on the Submission Master for a week I instinctively transitioned from the Triangle to the Arm Bar.  I’ve also noticed that working with the Submission Master has helped me realize how I need to lift my hips up toward the head as I work for submissions like the ones I’ve talked about.  I know I keep blogging about it but with good reason.  I’m seeing success and want to share what I’ve found out.

We all know that the more reps you put in the better you muscle memory.  We also all can’t spend every waking moment at the gym or dojo.  Using the Submission Master has become a good way for me to satisfy my BJJ addiction.

Take a few minute and enter my contest to name my dummy and a chance to win a free Sprawl rash guard.  See my post: Name My Submission Master Grappling Dummy Contest.

See The Flying Bow and Arrow Choke In Action

I’ve seen flying triangles and flying arm bars but this has to be my new favorite.  That was just sweet!  I wish it had another angle so you could see the other side.  It looks like he grabs the collar and then leans over to hook the leg.  One of the things I found most interesting was how he tried to set it up.  The flicking of the hips to fake a hip throw and then the arm pull that gave him the back.  BJJ never ceases to amaze me.  It looks like the guy pulling the Flying Bow and Arrow Choke is a brown belt.  I can’t tell the belt on the other guy.  I have to wonder if it would have gone off so easy against another brown.  Then again they may only be training.  This is one of the reason I love training in the gi.  I don’t think you could do that in no-gi.  You would have to use the neck instead of the collar and it would really be slippery.  When you did get to the ground you would be able to do a collar choke either.  I wonder how this would go off in a street fight with the other guy wearing a coat?  I found this video on Georgette’s World – Flying Bow and Arrow Choke.

Life is Jiu Jitsu and Jiu Jitsu is Life.

5 Tips to Overcoming Claustrophobia In BJJ

There is nothing like being in North South with someone’s chest on your face to give claustrophobia or the fear of being suffocated.  You feel enclosed.  You are breathing hot moist air.  You desperately want to get out.  The next thing you know is your heart starts racing and your breathing with it.  What do you do to overcome this?  Here are the 5 tips I’ve gleamed and have started working on:

  1. Relax.  Easier said then done!  But I’ve found that I can reduce my anxiety by first reminding myself this isn’t life or death.  If it was he wouldn’t be staying on me in this position long before I took a huge bit out of his chest.  Think about something that will help you relax.  I try to think of something warm I like wrapped around me like a blanket.
  2. Control your breathing.  Once again, easier said then done!  If your opponent isn’t going to move then take that time to slow your breathing.  Chances are that is what he is doing too, resting.
  3. Find something to help you practice over coming it.  I have found that the hot moist air bothers me the most.  I can simulate that under a thick quilt.  I try to stay under longer each time.  I’m starting to develop more tolerance for the feeling.
  4. Improve your escapes.  If you have one that you get in all the time that causes you to feel claustrophobic then what better motivation to become a expert at getting out of it.
  5. Create Space.  When you are on the bottom that’s your job anyway.  It doesn’t have to be enough to escape at first.  You may do it just to get situated to wait for your opponents next move.  It may be just to make your opponent uncomfortable.  When you are moving around even a little you start to find pockets of comfort I’ve discovered.  If you stay still your situation is one dimensional.  Open up some other options for yourself by “wiggling” around.

Now not all cases of claustrophobia I understand are physical like mine.  Some require expert help.  I don’t presume to solve all cases in this post.  I’m just trying to as they say, cherry pick,  the easiest.  This is what is working for me.  I hope it helps you too.