Tomoe-Nage to Arm Bar on Takedown Tuesday

Tomoe-Nage to Arm Bar 1
Tomoe-Nage to Arm Bar 2

It has been a while since we had Takedown Tuesday.  We went over Osoto-Gari and I think the other was called Oshi-Gari.  It involved grabbing around the waist and stepping in for the throw over the hip.  I couldn’t find it on YouTube so I’m not sure I have named it correctly.

After class I asked for some instruction on my favorite throw or takedown, the Tomoe-Nage.  I have already done a few posts on Tomoe-Nage.  They are: "Tomoe-Nage Tops Takedown Tuesday" and "De La Riva to Tomoe-Nage Sweep on Magic Monday".  We had to excellent brown belts fresh from Argentina instructing us.  The first thing they pointed out was Tomoe-Nage has variations. The side throw I like and that is shown in Dave Camarillo’s book Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu: Revolutionizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is the Juko-Tomoe-Nage.  I couldn’t find anything on Google about it so I’m not sure I understood what they were saying.

After some instruction they showed me the Tomoe-Nage to Arm Bar that I have in the videos.  After throwing a guy a few time with the same throw he should get wise to it.  This looks like you are going for the throw but instead you get the arm bar.  Very sick!

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

O-Goshi or Over-Under Hip Throw on Takedown Tuesday

O-Goshi or Over-Under Hip Throw – JiuJitsuMap.com

On Takedown Tuesday we dropped the gis and went nogi for the O-Goshi or Over-Under hip throw.  You can find a demonstration of the O-Goshi in Karo Parisyan’s book "Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques" (page 107).

During the lesson, two points were brought up.  First of all if you have your arms over-under on your opponent he also has it on you.  This means you can’t muck around, once you have the position you have to capitalize on it quickly or your opponent might.

The second point was foot placement.  You step over to the opposite foot.  You don’t need to make a large sweeping step.  If you step to far you will be off balance and your opponent will easily throw you onto your back.

Getting into a clinch and working for dominate position by pommelling (working to get under the opponents arm with yours) is common.  I think someone who gets proficient with the O-Goshi might find they get to use it quite often.  It severs well in both gi and nogi of course which makes it a excellent takedown for you arsenal.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Change is Hard on The Orthodox

I don’t usually like to repost things I see on other sites.  I like to stay original.  But now and again I see something I just can’t leave out of my site.  This was posted by Roy Dean and then by TheJiuJitsuFighter.com, where I saw it.  The kid has really got it going.  He stuns his wrestling opponents with Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, and Judo moves.  It starts right off with him doing what looks like a flying arm bar that he just lets go of.  It gets better as he does Judo takedowns.  The wrestlers just don’t know what to do with him.  They are to used to orthodox methods of wrestling.  One kid has just had to much and faints.  I think he might have been taken down a few times hard.  None of them know how to land like they teach in Judo.  They take the full brunt of the takedowns.  He drags them back from the edges as they try to get away.  At about the 3:14 one kid gets angry and stands up like he wants to fight.  I think he was so surprised by the side control he loses it.  I even think I see him take a punch before standing up.  I understand that the kids coach didn’t want him to learn BJJ.  Time to change coaches I think.

Book Review of Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu By Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss

51-RDib6VsL._SL160_ There are some books that should just be standard in every BJJ practitioners library.  They should be well known throughout the community.  For example: Jiu-Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro.  So how did I miss Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu: Revolutionizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu by Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss.  The answer is simple.  I judged the book by its cover.  You know they tell you never to, but I did.  It was named "Guerrilla" and had a bullet hole between the words "Jiu Jitsu".  It didn’t say anything about all the super throws and takedowns in it.  A friend of mine convinced me to look at it and I was astounded.  Where Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques shows you no-gi throws and takedowns, Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu shows you gi and more!  Here was the book I had really been looking for.  It even had the Ashi-Barai takedown that I had just learned and was looking for the name of.  This is a Judo for BJJ book like no other.  I went on to see all kinds of flying takedowns.  So some would poo-poo this as just flash.  I say what a great way to catch your opponent off balance.  No one expects a flying attack.  Get a partner, put in the repetitions, and catch them with their pants down.  Judo has superior takedown and throwing technique while BJJ has superior ground fighting technique.  Anyone who wants to excel in BJJ needs to have more then a ground game.  Guerilla Jiu-Jitsu has excellent color photos and good descriptions with each technique.  I am now looking into getting the DVD’s (which once again look silly) Position: Impossible "Guerrilla Jiu Jitsu".  Please a guy in a gi with a pistol?  Dave Camarillo has got the moves just not the marketing skills.  In the mean while I have picked out a few throws to start practicing at class.  My love of the Balloon Sweep should translate nicely into the Tomoe-Nage Armlock that Dave shows in his book.  I’ll have to do a post on it after I prefect it.

The 4 Steps For A Successful Ashi-Barai Takedown

Here is the second takedown or throw we practiced the other night at BJJ class.  It took me a few days to find its name.  Once again I’m sorry I put my finger on the mic.  My hands were also shaking after the work out.

Ashi-Barai

The Ashi-Barai is about shifting your opponents balance to meet your needs.  It starts out a lot like the Ochi-Gari.

  1. Grip.  Because you will manipulate your opponents balance with your grip it is important to have a good hook grip on the collar and firm grip on the gi at the tricep.
  2. Balance and Step.  As you step in you lift the tricep and move the opponents balance over to the opposite foot you are going to block or trip.  This can or should cause a opposite reaction from him in the direction you want to sweep him.
  3. Twist and Step.  Now you twist him back the other way.  This motion should be added by his resistance to step two.  As you stick your foot out for the block or trip it is only intended to stop him from using it to gain balance.  You don’t need to kick or sweep the foot.  Just stop it from moving.  His forward momentum with your twisting action will do the rest.
  4. Capitalize.  Be ready to take a position or submission.  The technique isn’t successful if you both just end up in a sprawl.

I hope this is helpful.  It helped me memorize this technique by posting it. Thank you to Chris and Miles again for being the movie stars of this post.

Does Your Brain Change with BJJ?

I had a boss once who had taught college level math classes.  She told me a story one day about a student who had really struggled until one day, snap! It all clicked.  My boss was convinced that a physical change had taken place in her brain.  Studies of London cabbies show that the mental maps they have to create to get them around London change their brains physically.  There are studies on Grandmaster chess players too.  This leads me to wonder what changes take place from BJJ to our brain.  We map out moves and build strategies much like a cabbie or a chess master.  Over time as our brain changes and develops do we reach that "snap" point when things come much easier?  I seem to have more questions then answers.  I think that maybe learning is hard because we are reconfiguring or optimizing our brain for a desired out come.  We are building muscle memory and other systems to accomplish what we want in the most efficient manner.  This all takes time and effort.  In the end with have something that only those who are will to undergo the transformation have.

I think Jiu-Jitsu does make a positive change to your brain both physically and mentally.  I only wish I had a study to back it up.

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Review of Judo Throws and Takedown Books for Jiu-Jitsu

I got my books that I talked about in my post Should I Learn Judo to Excel in Jiu-Jitsu.  They are:

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Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques

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Throws and Takedowns for Sambo, Judo, Jujitsu and Submission Grappling

The "Judo for Mixed Martial Arts" was the book for me.  Its large color step by step pictures were perfect for my visual learning style.  I thought the organization of the throws and takedowns was excellent with its color coding of pages into sections.  The descriptive text was short and to the point.

"Throws and Takedowns" had a larger collection of just that, throws and takedowns.  It was smaller in size and didn’t have color pictures.  I think in order to really see what is going on its helps to have color.  Its like tying a knot with two pieces of white string or tying one that has two pieces of different colored string.  It is much easier to understand the knot when you see how it interlaces.  It also didn’t show enough pictures.  Where "Judo for Mixed Martial Arts" might show 20 pictures of the throw with different angles "Throws and Takedowns" only showed 6 to 8.  "Throws and Takedowns" had much more descriptive text to make up for the lack of visual content.  Having never done Judo before and I am new to takedowns and throws, it was hard to visualize how a technique was done.

Karo Parisyan got it right in my opinion.  I will be using his book in my quest to improve my BJJ with a arsenal of takedowns and throws from Judo.

Should I Learn Judo to Excel in Jiu Jitsu?

Is this a true statement "BJJ practitioners are terrible at takedowns and throws"?  It seems like that is the case.  I keep hearing things that lead me to believe it.  I know I’m deficient in takedowns and throws.  In fact when I sought advice on my first tournament I was told to go for the "flop".  The meaning was to jump into guard or just go for something that quickly brought us to the ground easily.  My instructor realized we needed more work in this area and we had a special seminar on takedowns (click to see one post I did on it).  It was very educational and I enjoyed it.  But what do we spend most of our time doing in BJJ?  Not takedowns or throwing, they are just a few techniques in the vast array of Jiu-Jitsu techniques.  So I’ve begun to wonder if Judo wouldn’t help me.  I’ve decided to investigate by ordering these books:

Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques

Throws and Takedowns for sambo, judo, jujitsu and submission grappling

I tried to find books on Judo but they all seemed specify for the sport of Judo and I didn’t think they would have the twist I wanted.  These two books looked like the closest match.  I will continue this post after I get them and have some time to read them.

I also sent a e-mail to John Will of Will – Machado BJJ asking what would be a good book or DVD on takedowns in his opinion.  He responded with:

"If I had to pick just one – I would go for John Smiths DVD entitled:
‘How Low can you go?’
"

I think I’ll try it next if these two don’t fill my needs.  I don’t want to be a flopper and I don’t want to fear takedowns.  I think Judo with a emphasis on BJJ and MMA side of things is important to make a efficient BJJ practitioner.

Review of the Submission Master Grappling Dummy – Part 1

So you have figured out that the wife or girlfriend isn’t you best choice for practicing your grappling with when you are away from class.  The next thing you think of is a grapping dummy.  That is just what I did.  I began looking at everything they had out there.  The first thing was to distinguish between a throwing dummy and a grappling dummy.  Once I had that sorted out there were a few contenders, Make-My-Own, Bubba, Grapple Man, and the Submission Master. I decided that making my own was a waste.  Even though there were instructions on making one out there, I just didn’t think it would come out right for me.  Of the pre-manufactured dummies  Bubba was the cheapest, then Submission Master, and last Grapple Man.  I decided on the Submission Master.  It will sit up in guard and the arms will hold position.  The Grapple man, although the most life like, was far to expensive and limp as a wet noodle.  The Bubba although cheaper just didn’t have the stance that the Submission Master did.  I could only find the Bubba on eBay and not for a real discount.  So I ordered the Submission Master and it is due to arrive tomorrow.  The process of ordering it was very haphazard.  The site is poor and when they sent me the UPS tracking number it was incorrect.  So far I don’t have to much faith in the company that is selling them.  Lets hope the product is as good as I think it is.

Once I follow the break in instructions and start to really use the Submission Master I will do a review on it and let you know if it is really worth the money. 

Here are the Reviews I have done so far:

  1. Submission Master Grappling Dummy Review – Assembly of the Dummy
  2. Name My Submission Master Grappling Dummy Contest
  3. Review of The Submission Master Grappling Dummy – Drilling
  4. Submission Master Grappling Dummy Taps Out For Me
  5. How To Use The Submission Master Grappling Dummy To Increase Muscle Memory

Recovering From Injury In BJJ or MMA

Royler Gracie said in his book Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Submission Grappling Techniques, “Over the years, I have learned that one of the most important things you  can do is to allow your body and mind to rest.  The natural tendency is to simply ignore the body’s messages.” (pg. 23)

I have seen a guy dislocate a elbow and be back in class the next week.  The addiction to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is that strong.  I have seem people training with a broken toe and sprained ankle.  I myself tore my MCL.  I sat out for about a month and a half.  My instructor told me to come during my injury and take notes.  I just could not.  I can not stand to just watch.  I tense up.  I want to be in the action. 

We have to fight another battle when we are injured in BJJ, MMA, or another martial art.  The battle to allow ourselves to recover physically.  Winning one battle doesn’t usually win the war either.  There is the mental rest we need too.  As much as we would like to spend all our time on grappling, take downs, arm bars, and chokes we need to give ourselves some mental rest too.

Royler also says farther down the page “Grappling is not a sport that you need to train for every day all day.  In fact, some of my top students prefer to train only a few days a week – except of course when competition nears.”  I find that two days a week is enough for me.  I put in only two and a half hours of physical training and the same for mental training.  It takes me the rest of the week to heal from bruises, pulled muscles, and other injuries throughout the week.  If I let myself think about Jiu Jitsu I’d do it all the time too.  I find that when I reset my mind it helps me to better absorb what I learn.  It all comes down to all things in moderation, even BJJ or MMA.