Don’t Make These Six Common Mistakes When You Begin Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

  1. Don’t pick the first school you see.  Not all Jiu Jitsu schools are created equal, shop around. Visit the schools that look interesting.  Most schools offer a free class or two.  Take them up on it before you sign up.
  2. Don’t start with a gi or kimono that doesn’t fit. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu gis or kimonos are cut for Jiu Jitsu not Karate or Judo.  You first kimono can be inexpensive but should fit properly.
  3. Don’t start without purchasing a mouth guard.  Chances are you are going to get banged up at first.  You don’t need a chipped tooth or dentist bill to remind you that a $5 mouth guard would have saved you a $1000.
  4. Don’t start without purchasing some knee sleeves.  They are cheap and save on bruises around the knees which come with being inexperienced and having your guard passed frequently.  Know one likes knee pain.
  5. Don’t start without purchasing a rash guard.  It acts like a work glove and helps keep bruising to a minimum plus protects you from skin to skin contact.  Some unsavory opponents could have ring worm or some other fungus.  You only want them to share their technique with you.
  6. Don’t think you are going to be Helio Gracie in the first month.  You will get tapped all the time at first.  Tell yourself you are going to try for a year before you decide if you are going to stop.

Jiu Jitsu is life and life is Jiu Jitsu.  By avoiding these six common mistakes you will enjoy both more as you begin the thrilling and rewarding path to BJJ (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu) enlightenment.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Beginners Books

I’m a beginner to Gracie Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.  I started Nov. 2008.  I was swamped with the many names of moves, techniques, holds, bars, chokes, sweeps, and the like.  I got a list of what was required for belt advancement or testing.  I then began to map them to pages in common books put out by Renzo Gracie and Royler Gracie.  The most common one that I use is:

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Theory and Technique (Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu series)

As I am taught a new hold, arm bar, or technique I look it up on the belt testing list I have and then I find it in my Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Theory and Technique book.  I add the page number to the list.  Its making it easier to remember what I’ve done and what the name is that goes with it.  I try to walk through the list now and again to help refresh myself.  I feel it is helping me advance faster.