Stopping The In Guard Stall Of Laying On The Chest.

I have noticed that sometimes when people are tired and in guard they will stall by laying on the chest of their opponent.  I’ve had this happen a few times.  They hug your chest and don’t give you much to work with.  A friend who was doing it to me, he weighs 65lbs. more then me, gave me a technique to help pry them off or reposition them.  Placing the palms of your hand in there eye sockets is legal in competition.  You push their head back with your palms in the eyes.  This exposes the throat to put a forearm in.  I was surprised at how easy this technique is to execute and how effective.  You can pry the largest opponent off your chest.  Now if you were in a street fight you wouldn’t use your palms but you get the idea.  I found that my opponents resisted as I pushed them up.  This worked to my advantage.  As they realized they couldn’t resist any longer they decided to posture up.  This left a few key seconds where they left themselves open.  I could change to a spider sweep, scissor sweep, or another technique that required some set up with a leg across the belly.  I think after I have used this a few times the opening I’m seeing will vanish.  But for now it seems to surprise my opponents and they pause between deciding to continue fighting to stay down or posture up.

I would like to hear from anyone else who tries this technique.

Mastering Jiu Jitsu One Step At ATime

In my blog The Undiscovered Frontier of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu I talked about new BJJ situations I have been getting in and how that shows growth in my opinion.  I gave a specific example of not knowing what to do with a arm bar that the guy is holding on to.  I said that I wouldn’t let that happen again or that I would learn from the situation.  I went home and drilled with my Submission Master Grappling Dummy on what I would do next time it occurred.  Last night in class it paid off.  I was rolling with another blue belt.  I had him in mount and transitioned to a side mount that I had seen Saulo Ribeiro use.  I faked a cross choke and took the arm.  He managed to get a hold of his arm and then my study and muscle memory training kicked in.  Without thought I threaded my leg through and put him in a triangle choke.  He tapped out shortly after I synched it down tight.  Oh baby! That felt good!  It can be so frustrating to be so close and yet blow it.  It was very satisfying to have identified, analyzed,  trained, and succeeded at improving my Jiu Jitsu.  The next step I think is to know a hand full of techniques I can use against a locked arms like that, not just the transition to the triangle choke.

The Undiscovered Frontier of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Every person that learns BJJ I think is like a explorer in a undiscovered land.  Rather poetic isn’t it.  Why I say this is as of late I’ve been seeing progress in my Jiu Jitsu.  I am finding myself in situations where I have been trained what to do but I’ve never been in them often enough or at all in a match.  For example the other day I got a white belt in a arm bar from mount.  I just don’t get arm bars that often.  I guess I haven’t been looking for them or I fight opponents higher then me that don’t leave themselves open.  What ever the case this white belt grabbed a hold of his arm forming a rectangle.  I tried to break his grip but he was far too strong.  I decided it was silly to try using muscle anyway.  BJJ is about technique.  So I tried a prying / cutting technique I had been taught long ago.  I didn’t get the technique correct and it had no effect.  The white belt now tried to sit up with his arms still locked.  I was now in real undiscovered country.  I didn’t know what to do to keep him down.  I instinctively pushed with my legs and knocked him back over.  I didn’t realize that the leg on the head was my control and thought he had fallen over because he was off balance.  When he tried again he managed to get up and stack me.  I was upset with myself for letting him out of a sure submission.  This isn’t the only situation where I’ve found my self in a dominate position or so near a submission and blown it.  I’ve decided its a good thing.  I went home and started practicing what I would do in that situation again on my Submission Master Grappling Dummy.  If I didn’t find my self on the verge of or in undiscovered frontier most of the time then I wouldn’t feel I’m learning.

Top 10 Gi or Kimono Rankings

Georgette tipped me off to the close out sales happening at Atama right now. After searching around I found a Mundial #5, red, A4 that I liked.  I purchased it for $50 off list price.  I’ve been looking for another gi or kimono to help give my Koral MKM Urban Camo a break.  Its starting to show signs of wear on the collar.  I really have been happy with my Koral.  With the exception of one patch having to be sown partially back on it has been great.  I started my Jiu Jitsu training in a HSU Judo gi.  I blogged about the differences between it and my Koral MKM in: Koral MKM Kimono vs HSU Kodokan Gi.  The Koral MKM is my only gi I use right now and I decided I need another to spread out the wear.  My Submission Master Grappling Dummy now wears the HSU.  I’ve heard good things about Atama and a good number of guys wear them at my school.  I will be sure to do a review about the differences between the Koral MKM and the Atama Mundial #5 after I get it.  Next I need to find a competition gi.  Urban camo and red aren’t accepted in most cases.  I need something in white, blue, or black.  I’ve heard that Koral and Atama are in the top 10 for gis but I haven’t been able to find any real rankings anywhere. Here is a guess based upon brands I see in competition:

  1. Koral
  2. Vulkan
  3. Atama
  4. ISAMI
  5. Gameness
  6. Lucky
  7. Venum
  8. Fuji
  9. HCK
  10. Keiko

Tell me the which and in what order you think they are.

How To Execute the Single Leg Take Down “Run The Pike”

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I just posted Secrets of The Single Leg Take Down or Shot.  Here is one of the single leg take down finishes that Clint went over called "Run The Pike".  I got most of it but my video recorder filled up and cut off the last.  It has enough of the technique to learn it.  I especially like this technique because I feel it is what BJJ is all about, technique.  Its called a momentum technique Clint says.  You don’t need muscle to do it.  You are just falling away from your opponent.  You are using the weight of your body and gravity to throw the person.  I weigh about 212lb.  My 40lb. 3 year old daughter likes to charge and crash into me.  If I’m not ready for it she can knock me off balance.  If she really blind sides me at the right time she can just about knock me over.  I use this example to illustrate the point that only 40lb. directed correctly can bring you down.  So with little effort a smaller person can use "Run the Pike" to take down a much larger opponent.

Clint simply steps back and drops his body.  It reminds me of going down a spiral stair case.  The dropping and sweeping motion create the technique.  One thing I didn’t include in the videos is that once have them on the ground don’t stop!  You can do a double leg bind for instance and then move to side control.  Check the video:

Single Leg Take Down "Run the Pike" – JiuJitsuMap.com

Secrets of the Single Leg Take Down or Shot

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.    I’ve covered the double leg take down and its finishes.  Now I am going to blog on the single.

Some of the secrets Clint shared with us were:

  1. Your head should always be on the inside when doing a single leg take down.  This keeps the target’s hips in check, avoids being flattened, and the Guillotine.
  2. Hips in and Head Up.  Your posture can make or break this technique.  You need to keep your hips in and your head up to get the power you need and to avoid losing control of the shot.
  3. Keep you target off balance.  Once you have the leg if you keep moving the target around until you get the position you want for the finish he won’t be able to go on the offensive.
  4. Lock the leg to you and not you to the leg.  He show how to hold the leg and at the same time be able to quickly let go or react if needed.

In the video Clint talks about how he doesn’t use the double leg take down against big guys and how the single is easier to recover from if you fail in the shot.  I will continue with posts on the finishes he showed next.

Here is the video:

Secrets To The Single Leg Take Down or Shot

Here are some of the other posts related to this seminar:

  1. Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finish Technique
  2. How to do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

 

How To Do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I posted the Hook Leg Take Down as one of the other finishing moves Clint showed us.  The other one was the Flare or Cut-Corner take down.  It was a little more difficult of the the two double leg take downs.  It involves changing your direction of attack.  In the Hook Leg take down you just keep driving forward.  With the Flare or  Cut-Corner take down you change direction half way through.  It also reminds me of the BJJ technique called Baiana.  If you combined a shot with a Baiana you would get the Flare or Cut-Corner in my opinion.  I had a hard time pushing off of my posting leg to do this technique.  I think part of it was in learning I wasn’t doing it full strength.  I needed to have the target off balance for it to work properly.  I apologize for how shaky the video is. After working out for a while and being slammed to the mat a few times it was hard keeping it still.

Here it is on YouTube.com:

 

If you can’t see it please click HERE

The Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finishing Technique

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  Clint continued the seminar with finishing techniques.  One of them was how to finish your take down or shot with the hook leg take down.  This is a finish to use after you have done your follow through.  Clint does a excellent job I think of showing how to really step thorough your target and then follow through with the momentum to get the finish.  He also shows how to continue working for the finish if you don’t get it right off.  I think most BJJ practitioners are weak in this.  I know I am.  Clint even mentions at one point how a typical BJJ guy won’t even need the finishing move if the initial shot or impact is hard enough.   In most cases the target will just fall back and try for guard.  I found it easy to do the hooking motion.  But I noticed for my partner that has more muscle then me it was harder.

I have also included the video on YouTube.com  Here it is:

Hook Leg Take Down

6 Steps Of The Shot or Take Down

Saturday I attended a Free Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu-Jitsu.  Clint went over a number of things.  I will post each day until I get them all covered.  Today’s post is about the basics of the Shot.  Here are the 6 steps or parts of a shot.  In the video I have included Clint goes over them and explains in more detail.  I will give a synopsis of each step.

  1. Distance – To make a shot you need to be a bent arms length from your target.
  2. Setup – Before making the shot you need to distract or throw off your target.  This is can be done in a number of ways.  The one noted by Clint is just to cause the person to blink by taping their head.  The Setup may also include positioning your self to get ready for the shot.
  3. Level – You should drop down to waist level as you shoot.
  4. Penetration Step – A common drill in BJJ that simulates this is called the “duck walk”.  As you shoot forward you want to moves as if going through them.  This nocks them off balance and gives you control.
  5. Follow Through – This continues the shooting motion.  If you don’t follow through all you have done is stop at their feet.  You are now in a compromised position for a sprawl or to have them take back control on you.
  6. Finish – This the the last move that takes them down.  I will be posting more then one finish we went over.  In this basic example it is simply wrapping the leg that is moving forward from the follow through around the closest leg of the target.  This of course trips them in the case of a double leg take down.

Watch the video with these things in mind and it should help you get more out of it:

If you can’t see the video click HERE to see it on YouTube.com

A Funny But Effective BJJ Technique To Get The Rear Naked Choke

You have back control and you have your hooks in.  You are trying to put a Rear Naked Choke or any choke on the guy for that matter but can’t get under his chin.  Here is a funny but effective BJJ technique that I learned from Mark Johnson at West Side Jiu-Jitsu.  Underneath your nose is a bundle of nerves.  Now the funny part, rub in a sawing motion the nerves upward with the blade of your hand.  It looks like you are scratching under their nose for them.  At first they resist and then as you increase the pressure it hurts.  The next thing you know they lift their head and you quickly slide your hand from the nose to the throat.  When I saw this I realized that they use this when they take pictures of babies.  The photographer would put her finger under my child’s nose to get her to raise her head for the photo.  I always wondered why the child would look up so easily with it.  Its not so much that it hurts at first as it is annoying.  Below is a picture of me showing the position of your hand with my Submission Master Grappling Dummy.  I know that descriptions don’t always work.

Finger-Under-Nose-Technique