Blue to Purple Belt – Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

So you got your blue belt, Congratulations!  If you are feeling like me you are excited.  The thrill of achievement has you thinking, “what do I need to do now to get my purple belt”.  The simple answer is time and practice.  This isn’t exactly what you wanted to hear but what you expected, isn’t it?  After asking my instructor and other basic research the average blue belt takes 3 years to get a purple belt.  But you are pumped up right now.  You say to yourself, as I do, “but I’m not average”.  The fact that you are out looking for what the requirements are and trying to start working towards your purple belt helps reinforce that.  After all the average time for a white belt to blue belt is 1.5 years and you did it in less, didn’t you?  So you will achieve your purple belt sooner then 3 years.  This is how I plan to do it.  I hope my ideas inspire and help you to pass your purple belt test early.

  1. Keep a Jiu-Jitsu Journal.
  2. Learn the purple belt techniques. (Pedro Sauer Purple Belt Test)
  3. Create a daily drill routine.
  4. Research the greats. (My favorites Roger Gracie, Saulo Ribeiro, and Andre Galvao)
  5. Attend Another Dojo, School, or Academy
  6. Mentor a white belt.
  7. Set Goals.

By clicking on any one of these you will go to the article that gives specifics on what I’ve planned for myself.

Please feel free to add your comments or ask me questions.

Improve your Jiu-Jitsu through Exposure at other Dojos, Schools, or Academies

When I took my blue belt test I tested at Unified Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu – Pedro Sauer Team.  I hadn’t to that point attended or trained at any other academy, school, or dojo.  I got to spend some time before the test with a class.  I realized right off that it was good to get a larger perspective on my chosen martial art.  In the half hour I was there for the class and the two for the test I was exposed to new ways of doing things and different approaches to training.  I think my present Jiu-Jitsu instructor summed it up best in his post Fred Ettish was a Frog.  To summarize it, if you isolate yourself to only one group your skills and technique are limited by that group.  You need to get out and experience new challenges and different situations.

I think the idea configuration is that you should have a primary instructor and two secondary instructors.  They should not be closely associated with each other.  Your primary is the one you attend on a regular basis and test with.  The secondary’s you attend only on a monthly or bi-monthly basis.  I think this will help to reduce the “frog in the well” trouble talked about with Fred Ettish.

Once again the goal is to improve your Jiu-Jitsu and have fun doing it.  Not to mention that you will make new friends and get tapped out in new ways.  I hope this help you accelerate your training and enjoyment of Jiu-Jitsu.

Please share with me your experiences.

Saulo Ribeiro Jiu-Jitsu Revolution (Series One) – Teach Yourself at Home

Unless you are financially secure and can spend every waking minute at the dojo or gym with a qualified Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) instructor going over technique and training you need to do some homework.  But I don’t have any one to work or roll with you say.  How am I going to train at home?  I thought the same thing.  I first tired using my wife as my grappling partner.  That didn’t work.  First of all if she got bruised, which is common in Jiu-Jitsu, what were people going to think.  “Hey did you see that bruise on his wife?!”  You can only imagine where that would lead in peoples minds.  So I got a few books to read.  One of them was Jiu-Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro (Click it).  I was so impressed by the way he taught and what he taught I began searching for more from Saulo.  I soon found his DVD instructional series starting with Saulo Ribeiro Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Revolution Series One. Six Volume DVD Instructional Series for Grappling and Mixed Martial Arts (Click It).  It was just what I needed for training at home.  I could watch it, ponder it, and be ready to maximize my time when training.  I still couldn’t get the same level of physical training at home as I did at the dojo but now I felt like I could make progress outside of my two classes a week.  I think it is starting to show in my training too.  I’m remembering what I see on the DVD during a match and I’m starting to have success because of it.  The next thing I need is a Grappling Dummy (Click it) and some mats.  I think that will take me to the next level of solo training at home.  I’ve also been considering a subscription to Gracie University online.