Double Leg Takedown Bruce Lee Style

The other day I can across a book I had bought when I was a young lad called “Enter to Trapping to Grappling (Jeet Kune Do)”.   Before I even had heard of BJJ, I was thinking of following in Bruce Lee’s foot steps.  Now years later my one love is Jiu-Jitsu.  I immediately noticed the grappling in the title and wondered what Bruce considered grappling or what aspects of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu might overlap with the Jeet Kune Dosystem.

As I searched the book I came across my old friend the Double Leg Takedown.  It isn’t an easy thing to do.  In fact the best instruction I ever got was from Clint at the seminar held at West Side.  I blogged about it in 6 Steps of the Shot or Takedown.  I still do not feel I have the double leg takedown close to armature level.  So I broke into laughter when I saw the two pictures and accompanying text that teach it in this book.  The text reads:

“Bend forward and throw your opponent by picking up his legs as you shove forward with your right shoulder”

Followed by two pictures:

double-leg-takedown-bruce-lee-1double-leg-takedown-bruce-lee-2

Now I am not trying to knock Bruce or Jeet Kune Do.  As anyone knows who spends time looking at grappling books, they are not all created equal.  For this technique this book falls woefully short.  But it gave me a great laugh.  If only it was that simple that one sentence and two pictures could teach it.

I went on to find other interesting throws and locks in the book but none that were a direct one-to-one with BJJ or Judo.  But some came close.  Who knows maybe after some careful study and a lot more pictures I might be able to adapt a few.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Throw, Throw, Throw Again

Hip Throw, Double Leg takedown ("Baiana"),  Single Leg takedown, Seoi-Nage, and Osoto-Gari to name a few of the throws or takedowns employed in BJJ.  What do they have in common other then taking your opponent to the mat?  They take a lot of practice.  Last night we worked on take downs.  We started off by practicing how to land correctly.  It hurts when you slap that hand to the mat but its a lot less painful then landing incorrectly.  We then went into the 3 basic throws or takedowns used in BJJ.  First was the hip throw from a "T" position.  Next was a leg hook and driving back to take your opponent down.  Last but not least the foot behind the far foot of your opponent and sitting down.  They all look so simple, so why is it someone always gets hurt? We had a few minor injuries at class.  I think it is because we don’t practice them as much.  All the more reason to throw, throw, throw again.  After I tore my MCL I had a fear of throws and takedowns.  I decided I couldn’t let that ruin my love for Jiu-Jitsu.  Last night in class I got the chance to do the very takedown with my instructor that tore my MCL.  This time I was a experienced blue belt.  I didn’t make the mistakes I did before.  My fear is gone and I have a new love for throws in particular.  What changed my fear to enjoyment was my desire to over come adversity.  As with anything in BJJ you need to try, try, try again.  John B. Will said it best ". . . It is difficult to extend ourselves to the point of being uncomfortable, but the rewards can be more than worth the risks." (Rogue Black Belt – Book One, pg. 77)

How To Execute the Single Leg Take Down “Run The Pike”

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I just posted Secrets of The Single Leg Take Down or Shot.  Here is one of the single leg take down finishes that Clint went over called "Run The Pike".  I got most of it but my video recorder filled up and cut off the last.  It has enough of the technique to learn it.  I especially like this technique because I feel it is what BJJ is all about, technique.  Its called a momentum technique Clint says.  You don’t need muscle to do it.  You are just falling away from your opponent.  You are using the weight of your body and gravity to throw the person.  I weigh about 212lb.  My 40lb. 3 year old daughter likes to charge and crash into me.  If I’m not ready for it she can knock me off balance.  If she really blind sides me at the right time she can just about knock me over.  I use this example to illustrate the point that only 40lb. directed correctly can bring you down.  So with little effort a smaller person can use "Run the Pike" to take down a much larger opponent.

Clint simply steps back and drops his body.  It reminds me of going down a spiral stair case.  The dropping and sweeping motion create the technique.  One thing I didn’t include in the videos is that once have them on the ground don’t stop!  You can do a double leg bind for instance and then move to side control.  Check the video:

Single Leg Take Down "Run the Pike" – JiuJitsuMap.com

Secrets of the Single Leg Take Down or Shot

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.    I’ve covered the double leg take down and its finishes.  Now I am going to blog on the single.

Some of the secrets Clint shared with us were:

  1. Your head should always be on the inside when doing a single leg take down.  This keeps the target’s hips in check, avoids being flattened, and the Guillotine.
  2. Hips in and Head Up.  Your posture can make or break this technique.  You need to keep your hips in and your head up to get the power you need and to avoid losing control of the shot.
  3. Keep you target off balance.  Once you have the leg if you keep moving the target around until you get the position you want for the finish he won’t be able to go on the offensive.
  4. Lock the leg to you and not you to the leg.  He show how to hold the leg and at the same time be able to quickly let go or react if needed.

In the video Clint talks about how he doesn’t use the double leg take down against big guys and how the single is easier to recover from if you fail in the shot.  I will continue with posts on the finishes he showed next.

Here is the video:

Secrets To The Single Leg Take Down or Shot

Here are some of the other posts related to this seminar:

  1. Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finish Technique
  2. How to do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

 

6 Steps Of The Shot or Take Down

Saturday I attended a Free Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu-Jitsu.  Clint went over a number of things.  I will post each day until I get them all covered.  Today’s post is about the basics of the Shot.  Here are the 6 steps or parts of a shot.  In the video I have included Clint goes over them and explains in more detail.  I will give a synopsis of each step.

  1. Distance – To make a shot you need to be a bent arms length from your target.
  2. Setup – Before making the shot you need to distract or throw off your target.  This is can be done in a number of ways.  The one noted by Clint is just to cause the person to blink by taping their head.  The Setup may also include positioning your self to get ready for the shot.
  3. Level – You should drop down to waist level as you shoot.
  4. Penetration Step – A common drill in BJJ that simulates this is called the “duck walk”.  As you shoot forward you want to moves as if going through them.  This nocks them off balance and gives you control.
  5. Follow Through – This continues the shooting motion.  If you don’t follow through all you have done is stop at their feet.  You are now in a compromised position for a sprawl or to have them take back control on you.
  6. Finish – This the the last move that takes them down.  I will be posting more then one finish we went over.  In this basic example it is simply wrapping the leg that is moving forward from the follow through around the closest leg of the target.  This of course trips them in the case of a double leg take down.

Watch the video with these things in mind and it should help you get more out of it:

If you can’t see the video click HERE to see it on YouTube.com