Book Review of Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu By Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss

51-RDib6VsL._SL160_ There are some books that should just be standard in every BJJ practitioners library.  They should be well known throughout the community.  For example: Jiu-Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro.  So how did I miss Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu: Revolutionizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu by Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss.  The answer is simple.  I judged the book by its cover.  You know they tell you never to, but I did.  It was named "Guerrilla" and had a bullet hole between the words "Jiu Jitsu".  It didn’t say anything about all the super throws and takedowns in it.  A friend of mine convinced me to look at it and I was astounded.  Where Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques shows you no-gi throws and takedowns, Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu shows you gi and more!  Here was the book I had really been looking for.  It even had the Ashi-Barai takedown that I had just learned and was looking for the name of.  This is a Judo for BJJ book like no other.  I went on to see all kinds of flying takedowns.  So some would poo-poo this as just flash.  I say what a great way to catch your opponent off balance.  No one expects a flying attack.  Get a partner, put in the repetitions, and catch them with their pants down.  Judo has superior takedown and throwing technique while BJJ has superior ground fighting technique.  Anyone who wants to excel in BJJ needs to have more then a ground game.  Guerilla Jiu-Jitsu has excellent color photos and good descriptions with each technique.  I am now looking into getting the DVD’s (which once again look silly) Position: Impossible "Guerrilla Jiu Jitsu".  Please a guy in a gi with a pistol?  Dave Camarillo has got the moves just not the marketing skills.  In the mean while I have picked out a few throws to start practicing at class.  My love of the Balloon Sweep should translate nicely into the Tomoe-Nage Armlock that Dave shows in his book.  I’ll have to do a post on it after I prefect it.

See The Flying Bow and Arrow Choke In Action

I’ve seen flying triangles and flying arm bars but this has to be my new favorite.  That was just sweet!  I wish it had another angle so you could see the other side.  It looks like he grabs the collar and then leans over to hook the leg.  One of the things I found most interesting was how he tried to set it up.  The flicking of the hips to fake a hip throw and then the arm pull that gave him the back.  BJJ never ceases to amaze me.  It looks like the guy pulling the Flying Bow and Arrow Choke is a brown belt.  I can’t tell the belt on the other guy.  I have to wonder if it would have gone off so easy against another brown.  Then again they may only be training.  This is one of the reason I love training in the gi.  I don’t think you could do that in no-gi.  You would have to use the neck instead of the collar and it would really be slippery.  When you did get to the ground you would be able to do a collar choke either.  I wonder how this would go off in a street fight with the other guy wearing a coat?  I found this video on Georgette’s World – Flying Bow and Arrow Choke.

Life is Jiu Jitsu and Jiu Jitsu is Life.

The Secret to High Percentage Submission BJJ and MMA Techniques

Everyone loves to see the Flying Triangle or the Flying Arm Bar.  They are spectacular.  But how often are they used and what percent of submission come from them?  Lets face it, not many.  The guy who wins the most matches in BJJ or MMA has good solid skills in the basics.  The secret to high percentage submissions is simplicity.  The more steps there are to a submission the longer it takes to set up and the more likely it will fail.  If a submission takes 4 steps to work, it only needs one to go wrong and fail.  A example of a high percentage sweep that comes to mind is the Hip Bump Sweep described in Jiu Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro.  It is simple to master and very efficient in execution.  If I were to give it a percentage I’d say 85% of the time I get it.  In the submission category the first one that I think of is what I call The Giant Johnson.  It is done from cross body.  You are on top and you arms are over you opponent and below his arms.  You simple reach under his arm and around his head and lock your hands together.  You now have a blood choke on him with his own arm and yours on the other side.  Simple and quick!  That is where the high percentage techniques come from.

You know the old saying “Keep is simple stupid”.  I can’t think of a better application for it then in Jiu Jitsu and MMA.