O-Goshi or Over-Under Hip Throw on Takedown Tuesday

O-Goshi or Over-Under Hip Throw – JiuJitsuMap.com

On Takedown Tuesday we dropped the gis and went nogi for the O-Goshi or Over-Under hip throw.  You can find a demonstration of the O-Goshi in Karo Parisyan’s book "Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques" (page 107).

During the lesson, two points were brought up.  First of all if you have your arms over-under on your opponent he also has it on you.  This means you can’t muck around, once you have the position you have to capitalize on it quickly or your opponent might.

The second point was foot placement.  You step over to the opposite foot.  You don’t need to make a large sweeping step.  If you step to far you will be off balance and your opponent will easily throw you onto your back.

Getting into a clinch and working for dominate position by pommelling (working to get under the opponents arm with yours) is common.  I think someone who gets proficient with the O-Goshi might find they get to use it quite often.  It severs well in both gi and nogi of course which makes it a excellent takedown for you arsenal.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Throw, Throw, Throw Again

Hip Throw, Double Leg takedown ("Baiana"),  Single Leg takedown, Seoi-Nage, and Osoto-Gari to name a few of the throws or takedowns employed in BJJ.  What do they have in common other then taking your opponent to the mat?  They take a lot of practice.  Last night we worked on take downs.  We started off by practicing how to land correctly.  It hurts when you slap that hand to the mat but its a lot less painful then landing incorrectly.  We then went into the 3 basic throws or takedowns used in BJJ.  First was the hip throw from a "T" position.  Next was a leg hook and driving back to take your opponent down.  Last but not least the foot behind the far foot of your opponent and sitting down.  They all look so simple, so why is it someone always gets hurt? We had a few minor injuries at class.  I think it is because we don’t practice them as much.  All the more reason to throw, throw, throw again.  After I tore my MCL I had a fear of throws and takedowns.  I decided I couldn’t let that ruin my love for Jiu-Jitsu.  Last night in class I got the chance to do the very takedown with my instructor that tore my MCL.  This time I was a experienced blue belt.  I didn’t make the mistakes I did before.  My fear is gone and I have a new love for throws in particular.  What changed my fear to enjoyment was my desire to over come adversity.  As with anything in BJJ you need to try, try, try again.  John B. Will said it best ". . . It is difficult to extend ourselves to the point of being uncomfortable, but the rewards can be more than worth the risks." (Rogue Black Belt – Book One, pg. 77)

See The Flying Bow and Arrow Choke In Action

I’ve seen flying triangles and flying arm bars but this has to be my new favorite.  That was just sweet!  I wish it had another angle so you could see the other side.  It looks like he grabs the collar and then leans over to hook the leg.  One of the things I found most interesting was how he tried to set it up.  The flicking of the hips to fake a hip throw and then the arm pull that gave him the back.  BJJ never ceases to amaze me.  It looks like the guy pulling the Flying Bow and Arrow Choke is a brown belt.  I can’t tell the belt on the other guy.  I have to wonder if it would have gone off so easy against another brown.  Then again they may only be training.  This is one of the reason I love training in the gi.  I don’t think you could do that in no-gi.  You would have to use the neck instead of the collar and it would really be slippery.  When you did get to the ground you would be able to do a collar choke either.  I wonder how this would go off in a street fight with the other guy wearing a coat?  I found this video on Georgette’s World – Flying Bow and Arrow Choke.

Life is Jiu Jitsu and Jiu Jitsu is Life.