The Healing Art of Jiu-Jitsu?

I find it ironic that one of the reasons I go to Jiu-Jitsu twice each week is for mental well being but not physical it seems.  What I mean by that is each week I find stress relief in class.  Its like popping the mental pressure value.  The aggression combined with the concentration on technique helps me.  But most of the time I spend the week recovering physically from class.  Yes, I get a good physical work out that helps me.  And yes, we are all considerate and try not to hurt our training partners.  Its just that every week there is something that has to heal on my body.  This week it is a jammed finger (I never even felt it happen) and a huge bruise from a failed Ashi-Barai.  I’m dotted all over with bruises in various stages of healing.  Most of my injuries heal in one week or aren’t painful anymore in that time.  I guess what I’m saying is I wish I would harden up a little or that I didn’t feel so old.  I can’t stop doing Jiu-Jitsu.  I know I’d miss it to much.  I’m a addict.  I guess the best course of action is to improve my technique and healing knowledge.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Recovering From Injury In BJJ or MMA

Royler Gracie said in his book Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Submission Grappling Techniques, “Over the years, I have learned that one of the most important things you  can do is to allow your body and mind to rest.  The natural tendency is to simply ignore the body’s messages.” (pg. 23)

I have seen a guy dislocate a elbow and be back in class the next week.  The addiction to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is that strong.  I have seem people training with a broken toe and sprained ankle.  I myself tore my MCL.  I sat out for about a month and a half.  My instructor told me to come during my injury and take notes.  I just could not.  I can not stand to just watch.  I tense up.  I want to be in the action. 

We have to fight another battle when we are injured in BJJ, MMA, or another martial art.  The battle to allow ourselves to recover physically.  Winning one battle doesn’t usually win the war either.  There is the mental rest we need too.  As much as we would like to spend all our time on grappling, take downs, arm bars, and chokes we need to give ourselves some mental rest too.

Royler also says farther down the page “Grappling is not a sport that you need to train for every day all day.  In fact, some of my top students prefer to train only a few days a week – except of course when competition nears.”  I find that two days a week is enough for me.  I put in only two and a half hours of physical training and the same for mental training.  It takes me the rest of the week to heal from bruises, pulled muscles, and other injuries throughout the week.  If I let myself think about Jiu Jitsu I’d do it all the time too.  I find that when I reset my mind it helps me to better absorb what I learn.  It all comes down to all things in moderation, even BJJ or MMA.

Gracie or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Freak Injuries

As in any sport or rigorous activity injuries happen.  With BJJ (Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu) it seems that they are the strangest, freakish, or weird.  For example, while rolling I attempted to do a escape and some how caught my upper lip with my thumb.  I scrapped my gum with my finger nail and had to struggle to untangle my hand from my mouth.  My instructor told me of a time where he got his eye lid turned inside out and got a rug burn on it while grappling.  Until it healed it hurt every time he blinked.  You don’t know how often you blink until have a rug burn on you inner eye lid.  The latest one I heard was from a friend.  While rolling he arched or upa’d.  Some how his pinky toe slipped into a mat seam and got caught.  As he finished the move it broke his toe!  Maybe it is just the nature of martial art made famous by the Gracie’s.  I don’t know.  In all the sports I’ve ever done I’ve never heard so many funny injuries.  Regardless of the injuries I am addicted to Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.  Viva la Jiu-Jitsu!

Please share with me your stories!