Fail Omoplata To Arm Bar Technique

Fail Omoplata to Arm Bar Part 1
Fail Omoplata to Arm Bar Part 2

A while ago I posted "Side Control to Omoplata".  Chris in our advanced class, last night, expanded on that technique by showing us how to get a Kimura should the attempt at a Omoplata fail.  Both of the videos show the same thing just from a different angle.  Its hard really seeing what is going on otherwise.  Thank you once again to Chris and Justin for letting me video this.  I’m not good at text descriptions.  I’m more of a visual learner.  Next time I’ll have to be the dummy.

Class went well last night and I had a fun time as usual.  I did some combo techniques that involved a lot of face contact with the gi (Arm Bar to Triangle to Omoplata).  At the end of the class my face looked like I had been sun burned from the gi burn.  I went home and applied some Gi-Burn-Be-Gone.  It is looking much better this morning and isn’t sore.  As usual though I have a few things more to heal.  We practiced the Baseball Bat Choke and I didn’t tap once quickly enough so it hurts to swallow today.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu.

Getting Knotty With the Kimura Knot

How do you tie your belt?  I’ll bet its the standard square knot that we all learn.  If you haven’t got your blue belt or don’t care you may use the famous granny knot.  I got to thinking about all the varieties of gis / kimonos.  But no one ever uses different knots to tie their belt.  So I began looking through a knot book and after fooling around for a while created what I’m calling the "Kimura Knot".  Its just like the triangle created with your arms when you are get a Kimura submission.  Here are the step to create one:

Step 1. Loop your belt around like you would for a square knot.

Step 1 Kimura Knot

Step 2: Bring one side under the belt forming a loop.

Step 2 Kimura Knot

Step 3: Bring the end down through the loop you have made in step 2.

Step 3 Kimura Knot

Step 4: Take the other end and place it under the belt forming a loop.

Step 4 Kimura Knot

Step 5: Bring it down through the loop and tighten both ends.

Step 5 Kimura Knot

There you have it!  The Kimura Knot.  Here it is on my Submission Master Grappling Dummy.

Dummy with Kimura Knot

Looks just like the triangle that you make when getting a Kimura Submission in my opinion.  For your next class tie your belt in a Kimura Knot and tell your buddies you learned it on JiuJitsuMap.com.  You may not be able to buy the coolest gi but you can be the only one who know a cool belt knot.

 

How Do I Know When To Tap?

Isn’t that obvious you say?  When it hurts, tap!  Apparently it isn’t that clear to everyone.  This Russian model and bodyguard didn’t know when to tap, "Former Russian Model Killed in Carjacking", even though she had Jiu-Jitsu experience.  There are more factors that play into it.  In her case the Porsche was more important then her life.  What are the things that hold me back from tapping?  Pride has to be number one.  I don’t want to be beat.  I have to hold out at least long enough that my opponent doesn’t think I’m a push over.  Those are the kinds of things I tell myself.  I tore my MCL because of that kind of thinking.  I changed my philosophy after that to "In a war there are lost battles even on the victors side".  I live to fight another day now.  I try to make each battle an accumulative learning experience, win or lose.  I feel I’m winning the war on most fronts now.  But it is far from over.  I have often wondered why Helio Gracie refused to tap when he said a technique was not "good technique".  I understand that Helio passed out in his fight against Kimura because Kimura was squeezing his ribs and stopping his lungs from expanding.  What about when Kimura broke his arm?  So I will end this post with this thought, tap when a technique is effective or accept the consequences.

Review of the Submission Master Grappling Dummy – Drilling

Its assembled and I’ve started drilling with it.  The first thing I noticed was how hard the floor is.  I don’t have a mat.  I have been thinking about if I should even get one.  I like some real world or practical application of BJJ.  If I got in a street fight I will use my Jiu Jitsu training but I doubt there will be a mat.  The next thing I noticed is that when I tried a Kimura it doesn’t feel right.  The structure of the Submission Master’s arm is a arch with no true joints.  At first I didn’t like this but then I realized it felt more like a arm that is trying to do a escape.  It gave me a different perspective on my Kimura technique and how to apply it.  The next thing I tried was the Triangle Choke.  This hurt at first because the dummy is so hard.  I didn’t realize how soft real humans are.  I worked my Triangle and figured out something new I hadn’t noticed before.  I posted Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Submission Techniques – The Triangle and gave tips and tricks on improving your Triangle.  I now can add to that getting the knee of the leg around the neck above the neck.  I have also found that just moving it around, it is 70 lbs, breaks me into a sweat.  It doesn’t do infinity drills so you have to reset some drills to do it over.  But for the most part you can do Arm Bars, Triangles, Kimuras, and other submissions over and over on each side.  For Cross Body and Mount work you sit or lay very high.  You don’t have a soft gut to lay into.  I also can’t hook the legs (grapevines) in mount.  What it comes down to is its no full substitute for a person but it does very well for what it is intended.  So far I really like it and feel it is money well spent.  It is true the $560 price tag is high but it sure beats the home made version I’ve seen on YouTube.com.  I think the only true competitor in its class is the Bubba.  I didn’t choose the Bubba because it didn’t sit up in guard, it looks light weight, and flimsy.  I’m going to start trying some escapes and sweeps on it tomorrow and see how they go.

No-gi vs. Gi – Part 2

In my post “Why Am I Writing About Gi vs. No-gi”  I talked about the differences between the two in my opinion and how I was going to but my thoughts to the test.  I did compete in a No-gi tournament.  I did lose and it was not for the reason I would have expected.  I couldn’t get the guy to let go of my wrists and I showed forth some really poor escape technique.  I was also very unprepared for the intensity with which I was meet.  I was too relaxed about it.  The match went like this: After some grappling back and forth he got both his hands around my neck and we just sunk into guard position.  I quickly passed his guard and got him in cross body.  This is when I couldn’t get him to let go of my wrists.  I transitioned in a upper cross body and worked his legs.  I made a nice smooth transition to mount and began looking for a arm bar.  I was in complete control at this time.  I was up 7 zip, then things went bad.  He managed to get a hold of my wrist on one side and with a nice upa rolled me over.  I escaped being mounted by pushing him right over me.  Before I could completely turn around he hit me broad side and fell into mount on me.  It was tied up at that point.  I could have still won but I made a sad attempt at escape from mount and then I make the critical mistake of turning on my side giving him a easy arm bar.  I was especially upset with myself after seeing the video when I realized I didn’t try a hitch-hiker escape.  I didn’t try any escape.  It was a sloppy arm bar too.  I was stunned by the speed of everything and the intensity.  Do I feel No-gi is a subset of Gi still?  Yes.  Do I feel you should train Gi first and then No-gi still? Yes.  Will I do another No-gi tournament?  Yes!  But not before I have a few classes to get the feel for the speed and bump up my intensity.  All BJJ rocks!  I learned a lot from that 3.5 minutes on the mat.  Just like when Helio Gracie came away from losing to Kimura.  What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.