Nogi “Snap Down” Wrestling Takedown

Nogi Snap Down Wrestling Takedown
Snap Down in Action

We also went over a wrestling takedown called the "Snap Down".  I think it is more timing then anything.  It would be cool if while pressing your forehead into the opponents temple that you got a tap but I think that unlikely. 

This takedown fits more into sport BJJ.  I don’t think in a street fight I’d be in a situation like this.  This also seems to be for when someone just wants to grab on to you and isn’t sure what to do.  If you look at my post "Dojo Wars At West Side", you will see towards the end when everyone was tired this became the dance of choice.  If a few people knew the Snap Down they might have had a good chance to use it.

The key points I got from this are:

  1. Applied pressure with the hand on the neck and the temple press causes discomfort and draw the opponents attention away from your true intent.
  2. The snapping down motion as they step forward uses their own momentum to help throw them down.
  3. The forearm on the neck along with your upper weight helps to pin them down and give you a chance to either go for the submission or move to a superior position.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Development Milestone – Tap Out Pat

By way of a journal entry.  I tapped out Pat Monday for the first time.  No, small accomplishment in my book. I was 1-4 against him that night.  I still have Chris, Miles, and Grayson to go and then Mark.  But one tap out at a time.

Pat was in a gi and the Ezekiel I got on him wouldn’t fly in no-gi but that’s the point of a gi isn’t it.  It was the first time I had seen Pat in a gi, as a matter of fact.

I’m not trying to brag.  Its just that others who have been training longer then you have are always progressing too.  They remain a step ahead of you.  To make a small leap and catch up for a bit is exciting.  I see it in the white belts eyes after I tap them out.  They are thinking just what I’m thinking about those better then me.  "When will I ever tap this guy you!".  "Will he always be better then me?"  I want to tell them to hang in there.  I try to tell them but I wonder if they believe me.  When they move up in rank they will still be in the same situation.  Over coming discouragement is part of learning.  Learning takes time and effort.  But I’m human and I often think "I give myself very good advice but I seldom listen" – Alice.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

The Submission Master Grappling Dummy Review – Assembling of the Dummy

I got my Submission Master grappling dummy yesterday for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.  I was very excited and hauled the 70 lbs box into the house.  The dummy comes in two pieces and requires some assembly.  Here it is all assembled and in my old gi.  Submission Master 1 One of the reason I decided to buy the Submission Master was that it will sit up in guard.  I found the video on YouTube.com very helpful in getting it put together.  It came with a poorly photo copied set of instructions that looked like something from a kindergarten craft project.  Here is the link to the Submission Master Assembly Instructions video.  He does make it look a lot easier then it was.  I had a hard time getting the rope tight enough.  I think I will have to go back later and tighten it or do it again.  That isn’t to big a deal.  I think it will loosen in time anyway and need to be retied.  I also followed the YouTube video about breaking the Submission Master in.  If you don’t break it in correctly you can pop stitches.  Here is the video to help you: Submission Master and Breaking It In.  After working the feet and legs as directed it sat right up.  I didn’t waste any time in trying out a Triangle Choke on it.  The first thing I noticed is that humans are softer then dummies.  I didn’t realize how hard the Submission Master would be.  Its was easy to practice a Triangle Choke to Arm Bar combination on the dummy.  I started breaking a sweat just trying to haul the thing around and get it in place for another technique.  I was getting a “caveman” work out just moving the thing.

In my next post I’ll tell you more about how my BJJ practices are going with it and other things I’m finding out as I work with it.

No-Gi vs. Gi – Part 3

In my two previous blogs, Why Am I Writing about Gi vs. No-Gi and No-Gi vs. Gi – Part 2 I blogged about my theory and experience with the gi and no-gi.  Today I came across a quote from Royler Gracie that supports my thoughts.  He said in his book Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Submission Grappling this: “I strongly recommend that everyone who is going to learn submission grappling train with a gi before taking the gi off.  There are many reasons for this.  The gi makes you more technical because it forces you to concentrate on the details and posture. . . Then once you attain a certain level of proficiency, take off the gi, and start to train submission grappling, you find it easy to adapt your techniques to the lack of a gi.  However, if  the opposite occurs – you learn to train without the gi and then someday need to fight with a gi – you will have great difficulty dealing with your opponent’s level of control over you.” (pg. 6)  He later even adds “I train with a gi most of the time. . . . I trained jiu-jitsu for thirty-four years and only took off the gi in 1996 when I fought in the Vale-Tudo Open in Japan . . .” (pg. 6-7).  So my observations and theory are verified by Royler Gracie.  You should start in the gi and only go to no-gi after you have reached a level of proficiency.

No-gi vs. Gi – Part 2

In my post “Why Am I Writing About Gi vs. No-gi”  I talked about the differences between the two in my opinion and how I was going to but my thoughts to the test.  I did compete in a No-gi tournament.  I did lose and it was not for the reason I would have expected.  I couldn’t get the guy to let go of my wrists and I showed forth some really poor escape technique.  I was also very unprepared for the intensity with which I was meet.  I was too relaxed about it.  The match went like this: After some grappling back and forth he got both his hands around my neck and we just sunk into guard position.  I quickly passed his guard and got him in cross body.  This is when I couldn’t get him to let go of my wrists.  I transitioned in a upper cross body and worked his legs.  I made a nice smooth transition to mount and began looking for a arm bar.  I was in complete control at this time.  I was up 7 zip, then things went bad.  He managed to get a hold of my wrist on one side and with a nice upa rolled me over.  I escaped being mounted by pushing him right over me.  Before I could completely turn around he hit me broad side and fell into mount on me.  It was tied up at that point.  I could have still won but I made a sad attempt at escape from mount and then I make the critical mistake of turning on my side giving him a easy arm bar.  I was especially upset with myself after seeing the video when I realized I didn’t try a hitch-hiker escape.  I didn’t try any escape.  It was a sloppy arm bar too.  I was stunned by the speed of everything and the intensity.  Do I feel No-gi is a subset of Gi still?  Yes.  Do I feel you should train Gi first and then No-gi still? Yes.  Will I do another No-gi tournament?  Yes!  But not before I have a few classes to get the feel for the speed and bump up my intensity.  All BJJ rocks!  I learned a lot from that 3.5 minutes on the mat.  Just like when Helio Gracie came away from losing to Kimura.  What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

Why Am I Writing About Gi vs. No-Gi?

If you have been in BJJ (Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu) or MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) for anytime you will have heard the gi vs. no-gi debate.  So why am I writing about it?  Because I want to hear some real arguments for no-gi as your foundation technique. I see no-gi technique as a subset of gi (kimono) technique.  If you use a gi to train, you learn a larger set of techniques that can be applied on the street.  Its true people don’t go around in gis.  It is also true they don’t always wear shorts, short sleeve shirts, and are all sweaty.  Winter is coming on and your typical person will be wearing what?  A heavy coat and long pants.  These are a perfect substitution for a gi.

It is my opinion that first you should train in the gi and only after achieving a belt or two worry about doing no-gi.  You want to improve your arsenal with no-gi.  You want a solid base to start with.  That is why you start in gi and later add no-gi classes.

Not convinced?  You don’t fall into the pride category then like this blog entitled Be Proud, but Humble on Tap or Die suggests, I hope?  I am going to put my money where my mouth is and go to a no-gi tournament having never done no-gi.  I’ll let you know how it goes.  In the mean while, let me hear your side of the debate.