Top 5 Secrets to Holding the Mount Position

So you are getting better at your sweeps and escapes and you are finding yourself gaining the mount position more and more often.  But you can’t seem to stay on.  Your opponent bumps you right off.  Here are some secrets to keeping that position long enough to make the submission.

  1. Get up under the arm pits.  Don’t sit up back on the guys hips.  You are sitting on his most powerful lever.  Move up by lifting his elbows and sliding your legs under.
  2. Lower your point of gravity. Don’t sit straight up like you are a cowboy in the saddle.  You want your weight to help hold the person in place. Use your free arms for base.
  3. Lock your legs.  Some people call this “grapevines”.  It involves getting hooks around your opponents legs.  Usually this also has you with your arms out forming the base.  If you can’t hook the legs, another option is crossing your legs under the buttock.  This gives you more stability.
  4. Let the storm pass.  When you first get someone in mount they are going to upa and try to escape.  No one wants to be in mount.   It makes them panic. They will throw everything they have at you to get out.  But in time they will tire and the storm will pass.  If you ride it out before attempting a submission you will have had some time to rest.  Now that they are wore down it is time to look for a submission.
  5. Keep your dominance while looking for the submission.  You opponent my be tired now, frustrated, or even ready to give up but don’t sacrifice your base for the submission.  You can still keep yourself forward under the arm pits and your legs locked.  You could even switch to a forward side mount that gives you more room to look for that coke or arm bar.  Just don’t fool yourself thinking that you can easily cherry pick a submission now.  Maintain your base while looking for the submission.

Going For the Submission

In BJJ (Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu) submission is king!  To win the mental and physical game of chess is everyone’s goal.  Every newbie to the mat starts out with only one thought “MAK’EM TAP OUT”.  I include my self in that statement.  I didn’t think about cunning and technique to start out.  I only wanted my first Arm Bar or Triangle Choke.  I focused everything on it.  Now that I have my blue belt you could say I’ve seen the light and I know I’ve just started on the path to perfection.

If going for the submission is your first goal you will succeed in being submitted.  If your thought process follows:

  1. Transition
  2. Position
  3. Submission

You are on your way to true enlightenment.  Submissions come as a end result of well laid foundation.  Its true that the thing the untrained eye sees and remembers the most is the finishing blow or frantic tap.  Once that mind is trained you begin to see the lead up that makes the submission a natural sequence of actions.

I’m going to call it the Jiu-Jitsu pyramid.  Start out with your thoughts focused on transitioning from where you are into the position you want to be in.  Once that is accomplished think about bettering your position.  When and only when you have your satisfactory position think about submission.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Submission Techniques – The Triangle Choke

I’ve been studying the Triangle Choke in order to improve my success ratio with it.  By teaching you retain and learn better yourself.  I hope by sharing with you what I found out we both benefit.

To start with I reviewed the Triangle Choke in four different books and two different videos along with instruction I received in class.  The books I used were:

The videos I looked at where:

Here are the keys to locking down a successful Triangle from my study.

  1. You don’t want the leg over the neck to be on the shoulders at all.  The leg on the neck must be only on the neck and tight against it with the leg perpendicular to the line of the neck.  You are making a cross.  As you position your leg across the neck you don’t have to worry about them slipping out because you have control of the arm.   Here is a video that illustrates my point: Flying Triangle Choke.  He does get the Triangle but its a sloppy one and had the guy not panicked I think he could have worked his way out.
  2. Your hips should align with his neck.  You are creating a collar.  If your hips are to far past his neck or below you are creating space that keeps you from locking.  Walk your shoulders out or in to get your hips under his neck.
  3. Get the arm across.  Eddie Bravo is the odd man our that doesn’t move the arm across the body.  Control of the arm and its position are critical to the success of the Triangle.
  4. Grab your shin not your foot when pulling the leg across the neck forward to get it perpendicular .  The instinct is to grab the foot.  This puts pressure on your own ankle.  It is better to grab the shin which is solid and not give yourself a sprain or ankle lock.  If you can’t sit up enough to get the shin your hips may be not be aligned correctly.
  5. Angle your hips to get the strangle.  You do this by pulling your upper body to one side or at the same time you hook the leg over the neck.
  6. Lock the leg over where your knee bends while pointing up the toes.  If your Triangle technique is correct you should be able to drop your other leg over the leg across the neck.  This completes the Triangle.  I’ve found that sometimes you don’t even need to get the lock in place if it is correct.  Your arm pulling on your shin with the leg correctly over and tight against the neck can have the same effect as the lock.
  7. Squeeze the legs together, lift the hips,  and pull the head down to get the submission.  Once the lock is in place if that isn’t enough to make them tap then add the fine tuning to put the hurt on fast.
  8. Sweep a stack!  If he starts stacking forward reach over and hook his leg opposite the arm that is in the Triangle.  You have control of his head and arm making his base only one leg.  You have now locked his leg and what can he do as you push with your hips against his upper body?  He will fall over and maybe you will end up in a mounted triangle.  Talk about going from the frying pay into the fire for him.