Roger Gracie vs Bruno Bastos at Mundials

I just watched the Roger Gracie vs Bruno Bastos match on Georgette’s Blog.  Here are some of the things that caught my attention and that I was impressed with.  First of all, 2/3 of the match with just jockeying for the takedown.  I know that having takedown skills are important in your game. I was more impressed with the importance of them as I watched Roger and Bruno battle it out.  In my mind it looked like Roger realized it was going to stalemate if they kept going on like this so he jumped guard to move it to the ground game.  The next thing that caught my attention was the taking-the-back, as Georgette points out by Roger.  I had just read Meerkatsu’s post "K-Taro Nakamura Back Control & Choke Review" and was thinking about the "Armdrag from closed guard with back take" example.  Roger did it with style of course and made it look easy.  I find that getting up and moving my hips out is the hard part.  Roger gave me a few pointers as he did it.  I noticed he grabbed the opposite knee and pushed off the hip with the leg he was trying to get around.  Once the hips came out Bruno couldn’t or didn’t stop the rest of him.  Roger then, it looks like, put a body lock on him and rolled him over.  I couldn’t tell what submission he used to finish it.  Does anyone know?

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Finding a Way to do Jiu Jitsu On the Road

I haven’t been able to post at all this week.  I’ve been on the road for work.  I had hoped that at least one night this week I’d be able to get in a practice at a school near where I was.  I even scoped out the two school I hoped to visit, Underdog Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Royce Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.  But as luck would have it things didn’t work out.  I was bummed and feeling Jiu Jitsu withdrawals until a co-work of mine turned me on to Gi Subs 1, a iPhone application that shows gi submissions by iFightVideo.com.  It wasn’t as good as doing it but while I sat on the plane I could go over a whole bunch of new gi submission all for $2.99.  Once again saved by the iPhone and a enterprising Jiu Jitsu teacher.  I got researching and found two No-gi applications for the iPhone by the every popular Grapple Arts.  One is on sweeps and the other on submissions.  They were a dollar more expensive then Gi Subs 1 but its cheap entertainment compared to the $14 the airline wanted to watch one of their movies in flight.  Plus it goes with me know when ever I have my iPhone with me.  After I had my fill of watching submissions on my iPhone I turned to my old stand by GRACIEMAG.  I had the July 2009 issue detailing the 2009 World Championships.  I never get tired of watching or reading about Roger Gracie, not to mention Marcelo Gracia.  All of this combined I survived the business trip hungry but not starving for BJJ.  I might also not may Mundial #5 Atama was waiting for me when I got home.  I’ll have a review on it this next week after I use it in practice.

Jiu Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu Jitsu

Blue to Purple Belt – Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

So you got your blue belt, Congratulations!  If you are feeling like me you are excited.  The thrill of achievement has you thinking, “what do I need to do now to get my purple belt”.  The simple answer is time and practice.  This isn’t exactly what you wanted to hear but what you expected, isn’t it?  After asking my instructor and other basic research the average blue belt takes 3 years to get a purple belt.  But you are pumped up right now.  You say to yourself, as I do, “but I’m not average”.  The fact that you are out looking for what the requirements are and trying to start working towards your purple belt helps reinforce that.  After all the average time for a white belt to blue belt is 1.5 years and you did it in less, didn’t you?  So you will achieve your purple belt sooner then 3 years.  This is how I plan to do it.  I hope my ideas inspire and help you to pass your purple belt test early.

  1. Keep a Jiu-Jitsu Journal.
  2. Learn the purple belt techniques. (Pedro Sauer Purple Belt Test)
  3. Create a daily drill routine.
  4. Research the greats. (My favorites Roger Gracie, Saulo Ribeiro, and Andre Galvao)
  5. Attend Another Dojo, School, or Academy
  6. Mentor a white belt.
  7. Set Goals.

By clicking on any one of these you will go to the article that gives specifics on what I’ve planned for myself.

Please feel free to add your comments or ask me questions.