The Devil is in The Details with Technique

I watched the Marcelo Garcia highlights video on Georgette’s Jiu-Jitsu World.  Marcelo makes it look so effortless getting to the back and most of all putting in that Rear Naked Choke.  But I’ve come to understand from experience that The devil is in the details.  I learned this when I tried to master the Triangle.  I found there were many unseen facets to the technique.  It took me a while to really get good at it.  I had to watch video of may different people doing it.  I read books telling the exact way.  But most of all I had to try it out and do reps of it.  At this point I think I have a good mastery of it.

My thoughts have turned to getting the back and the rear naked choke.  I feel  that same feeling I did when I first started learning the triangle choke.  I know the fundamentals but I don’t seem to be able to get it to work in a roll.  Marcelo inspired me to make it my next choke-of-choice.  Roy Dean has set me on the path to master it.  So who is really good and showing the nuances of getting to the back?

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Top 5 Reasons Why Roy Dean DVDs Rocks!

I just purchased Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: NO GI Essentials by Roy Dean.  I have really enjoyed Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Blue Belt Requirements: Fundamentals for All and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Purple Belt Requirements: Gateway to the Advanced Game also by Roy Dean.  I have the nogi tournament, Scrap for the Skull coming up at the end of the week.  “No Gi Essentials” won’t get here in time of course but if it is as good as the others it will become one of my core instructional videos.

Here at the 5 reasons why I think Roy Dean’s DVD’s rock!:

  1. They show clearly the technique from 5 different view points.
  2. The DVD video is sharp, clear, and well lighted.
  3. Roy doesn’t perseverate or use pidgin English.  He only imparts what is essential.
  4. The techniques he shows are good core foundation techniques.  You can get all the latest slight of hand after you build good fundamentals.
  5. Roy doesn’t just show technique.  He goes into development and how to progress in your game.  He gives insights about what to expect and what you should try to strive for.

Roy Dean is one of the best.  Let me know what you like about him.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Review of “Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Purple Belt Requirements” by Roy Dean

I purchased Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Purple Belt Requirements: Gateway to the Advanced Game by Roy Dean a few weeks ago.  It came with ultra thin DVD’s of the type I had never seen before.  I thought they might not work correctly  as they had come lose in the shipping and looked like they could easily warp with the heat.  I was very glad to see they didn’t.

REVIEW: I have to say I’m very impressed with the quality and type of instruction in the DVD’s.  Roy Dean is easy to understand (no pidgin English).  The video is shown from different angles so you can see the technique done from all sides.  It has a easy to use interface that shows submissions based on positions.  The video looks professional not like it was done in a garage with a mat and curtains hung up for back drop.  If you are a beginner I wouldn’t start here.  I’d start with Saulo Ribeiro Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Revolution Series One.  I did a post a while back called "Review of Saulo Ribeiro’s Jiu-Jitsu Revolution, Series One".  Why I say that is, Roy Dean shows techniques that build upon foundation learning.  If I had looked at this in the first few months I was training I would have been over whelmed and would be missed the finer points that make it advanced.

The video goes into submission combinations and talks about having what I call "fall back positions".  If you miss the submission you "fall back" to another submission.  I took what I learned to class, after watching the Back and Mount segments of the video, it made a huge positive difference in my game.  Mr. Dean really helped me capitalize when I got a superior position.  In layman’s terms, once I got the back or mount I submitted them with little effort.

I’m going to buy Roy Dean’s other videos and he has a permanent place in my BJJ video collect.  Great video!

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Developing Technique Combinations in Jiu-Jitsu

Omoplata Combinations

John B. Will blogged "Mission Control", a post about building technique combinations.  He made mention of Eddie Bravo’s system and how it has a starting point to move into different techniques and submissions.  In Eddie’s book Mastering The Rubber Guard he has a excellent flow chart that shows how it all works together.  SlideyFoot talks about Roy Dean – Purple Belt Requirements and how he teaches a combination mindset.  Rigan Machado has turned me on to some combo’s in his "RCJ Machado Jiu-Jitsu Camp 2008" DVD’s.  I must have reached a new level in my game.  All of the sudden these not only made sense but I can flow from one to the other.  Lets just say I’ve really turned on to combos.  I picked a set out and drilled it on my Submission Master Grappling Dummy.  Once I felt confident enough to teach it, I found someone at the academy to train it with.  Blake and I put in some reps together.  This helped build my confidence in using it against someone other then my grappling dummy.  I got to try it out the next class.  It went splendid.  I even got one of the submissions in the combo against Blake who knew it was coming.  I can see how memorizing single submissions, then combinations of submission can build you a network of movement.  Over time it will build in my mind like Eddie’s flow chart.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu.

Change is Hard on The Orthodox

I don’t usually like to repost things I see on other sites.  I like to stay original.  But now and again I see something I just can’t leave out of my site.  This was posted by Roy Dean and then by TheJiuJitsuFighter.com, where I saw it.  The kid has really got it going.  He stuns his wrestling opponents with Jiu-Jitsu, Sambo, and Judo moves.  It starts right off with him doing what looks like a flying arm bar that he just lets go of.  It gets better as he does Judo takedowns.  The wrestlers just don’t know what to do with him.  They are to used to orthodox methods of wrestling.  One kid has just had to much and faints.  I think he might have been taken down a few times hard.  None of them know how to land like they teach in Judo.  They take the full brunt of the takedowns.  He drags them back from the edges as they try to get away.  At about the 3:14 one kid gets angry and stands up like he wants to fight.  I think he was so surprised by the side control he loses it.  I even think I see him take a punch before standing up.  I understand that the kids coach didn’t want him to learn BJJ.  Time to change coaches I think.