Throw, Throw, Throw Again

Hip Throw, Double Leg takedown ("Baiana"),  Single Leg takedown, Seoi-Nage, and Osoto-Gari to name a few of the throws or takedowns employed in BJJ.  What do they have in common other then taking your opponent to the mat?  They take a lot of practice.  Last night we worked on take downs.  We started off by practicing how to land correctly.  It hurts when you slap that hand to the mat but its a lot less painful then landing incorrectly.  We then went into the 3 basic throws or takedowns used in BJJ.  First was the hip throw from a "T" position.  Next was a leg hook and driving back to take your opponent down.  Last but not least the foot behind the far foot of your opponent and sitting down.  They all look so simple, so why is it someone always gets hurt? We had a few minor injuries at class.  I think it is because we don’t practice them as much.  All the more reason to throw, throw, throw again.  After I tore my MCL I had a fear of throws and takedowns.  I decided I couldn’t let that ruin my love for Jiu-Jitsu.  Last night in class I got the chance to do the very takedown with my instructor that tore my MCL.  This time I was a experienced blue belt.  I didn’t make the mistakes I did before.  My fear is gone and I have a new love for throws in particular.  What changed my fear to enjoyment was my desire to over come adversity.  As with anything in BJJ you need to try, try, try again.  John B. Will said it best ". . . It is difficult to extend ourselves to the point of being uncomfortable, but the rewards can be more than worth the risks." (Rogue Black Belt – Book One, pg. 77)

How To Execute the Single Leg Take Down “Run The Pike”

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I just posted Secrets of The Single Leg Take Down or Shot.  Here is one of the single leg take down finishes that Clint went over called "Run The Pike".  I got most of it but my video recorder filled up and cut off the last.  It has enough of the technique to learn it.  I especially like this technique because I feel it is what BJJ is all about, technique.  Its called a momentum technique Clint says.  You don’t need muscle to do it.  You are just falling away from your opponent.  You are using the weight of your body and gravity to throw the person.  I weigh about 212lb.  My 40lb. 3 year old daughter likes to charge and crash into me.  If I’m not ready for it she can knock me off balance.  If she really blind sides me at the right time she can just about knock me over.  I use this example to illustrate the point that only 40lb. directed correctly can bring you down.  So with little effort a smaller person can use "Run the Pike" to take down a much larger opponent.

Clint simply steps back and drops his body.  It reminds me of going down a spiral stair case.  The dropping and sweeping motion create the technique.  One thing I didn’t include in the videos is that once have them on the ground don’t stop!  You can do a double leg bind for instance and then move to side control.  Check the video:

Single Leg Take Down "Run the Pike" – JiuJitsuMap.com

Secrets of the Single Leg Take Down or Shot

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.    I’ve covered the double leg take down and its finishes.  Now I am going to blog on the single.

Some of the secrets Clint shared with us were:

  1. Your head should always be on the inside when doing a single leg take down.  This keeps the target’s hips in check, avoids being flattened, and the Guillotine.
  2. Hips in and Head Up.  Your posture can make or break this technique.  You need to keep your hips in and your head up to get the power you need and to avoid losing control of the shot.
  3. Keep you target off balance.  Once you have the leg if you keep moving the target around until you get the position you want for the finish he won’t be able to go on the offensive.
  4. Lock the leg to you and not you to the leg.  He show how to hold the leg and at the same time be able to quickly let go or react if needed.

In the video Clint talks about how he doesn’t use the double leg take down against big guys and how the single is easier to recover from if you fail in the shot.  I will continue with posts on the finishes he showed next.

Here is the video:

Secrets To The Single Leg Take Down or Shot

Here are some of the other posts related to this seminar:

  1. Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finish Technique
  2. How to do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down