Submission Master Grappling Dummy – My Life-Line to Jiu-Jitsu

I’ve reviewed and written a number of posts on the Submission Master Grappling Dummy.  I get a lot of questions along the lines of "its it really worth the money"?  I have always answered "yes"!  This week only served to strengthen that.  I’m a dedicated father and family man.  Its not uncommon to have conflicts with my training schedule.  This week was back-to-school week for my kids.  I had open houses to attend and last minute school shopping.  Needless to say I missed class this week but I had my Submission Master to save the day.  My grappling dummy has more then once become my life-line to Jiu-Jitsu.  After the kids were in bed, I broke out my new favorite training DVD Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Purple Belt Requirements: Gateway to the Advanced Game by Roy Dean and started working over Zed (my grappling dummy).  In no time I had worked up a good sweat.  I went over techniques at my own pace.  I formulated some new solo drills based off what I was learning from Roy Dean.  I got in some really good reps on some of the techniques I’d learned last week in class.

The Submission Master helps me keep my skills sharp when I can’t go to class.  It helps me work out new ideas I have.  It never complains or gets hurt.  One negative side affect though is its rough.  When working with the Submission Master for a extended amount of time remember to wear a rash guard.  If you don’t then try my solution to gi burn from my post "Gi Burn Be Gone".  It works great for me.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Dojo Wars at West Side???!!!

Takedowns on Tuesday Part 1

 

Takedowns on Tuesday Part 2
Takedowns on Tuesday Part 3

We practiced takedowns a week ago on Tuesday.  I had a pulled bicep and sat it out.  After watching my videos it looked like Dojo Wars!  With everyone going at once it was a battle scene.  As time wore on you can see the fatigue setting in.  By the time part 3 was being captured it turned from Dojo Wars to something like marathon dancing. LOL!  Most of the guys are just learning grip fighting and takedown technique.  I myself have nothing to brag about when it comes to grip fighting and takedown technique.  I have been trying to improve by reading Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu: Revolutionizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.  I did a review on it some time ago "Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu by Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss".  It has really opened my eyes.  But book learning and practical application are two different things.  I hope next week we have "Takedown Tuesday" as I’m calling it and I get a chance to go over some of the things I’m learning in the book.  Until then its time to drill what I can solo from the instruction in Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Improve Muscle Memory with a Solo Daily Drill Routine – Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

A big part of Jiu-Jitsu is muscle memory.  If you play basketball you shoot hoops over and over to improve your shot.  Its no different with Jiu-Jitsu.  It is just a little harder given you don’t always have a partner.  So what can you do to improve muscle memory?  Most of the books in, My Bookshelf, have drills in them.  You can find drill routines on YouTube.com

Here are some I like on YouTube:

When it comes down to it you need a routine tailored for your own needs that you can do anytime. 

Here is a example:

  1. Basic Warm up.
  2. Basic Survival Techniques from Jiu-Jitsu University
    1. Solo Side Control Guard Recovery Drill x 20
    2. Solo Mount Survival Drill x 20
    3. Solo Mount Elbow Escape Drill x 20
    4. Solo Knee-On-Belly Prevention Drill x 20
    5. . . .
  3. Escapes
  4. Submissions

You get the idea?  I love Saulo Ribeiro’s book, Jiu-Jitsu University.  It has some really good solo drills.  I would recommend you get it and see what I mean.

Start to build your drill routine by identifying where you want to improve.  I personally know I want to be strongest in my survival and escapes.  After that comes sweeps and submissions.

Some considerations you might want to take into account as you build varied drill routines.

  1. How much space to I have to work with?
  2. How long can I take on a routine?
  3. How often should I do my drills?
  4. How will I know I am progressing and need to change my drills?
  5. Are my drills effective or am I just making a fool of myself?

These are the questions I am asking myself as I build my drills.  I have already begun to notice changes in my game.  The techniques I’ve been drilling at are becoming automatic.  I do them without thought.  This has forced my opponents to change tactics and now I have a whole new set of techniques I need to better understand so that I can survive or escape.  This means I need to create new drill centered around them or include the techniques I need to improve on in my present routine.

Please share with me your drills that have helped you improve your Jiu-Jitsu.