O-Goshi or Over-Under Hip Throw on Takedown Tuesday

O-Goshi or Over-Under Hip Throw – JiuJitsuMap.com

On Takedown Tuesday we dropped the gis and went nogi for the O-Goshi or Over-Under hip throw.  You can find a demonstration of the O-Goshi in Karo Parisyan’s book "Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques" (page 107).

During the lesson, two points were brought up.  First of all if you have your arms over-under on your opponent he also has it on you.  This means you can’t muck around, once you have the position you have to capitalize on it quickly or your opponent might.

The second point was foot placement.  You step over to the opposite foot.  You don’t need to make a large sweeping step.  If you step to far you will be off balance and your opponent will easily throw you onto your back.

Getting into a clinch and working for dominate position by pommelling (working to get under the opponents arm with yours) is common.  I think someone who gets proficient with the O-Goshi might find they get to use it quite often.  It severs well in both gi and nogi of course which makes it a excellent takedown for you arsenal.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

The Compact Arm Bar on Magic Monday

Small Space Arm Bar

For the "Magic Moment" this week Chris shared with us a sweet Arm Bar that works well in confined, compact, or smaller spaces.  I especially like how it gives you control of your opponent even before you put the arm bar on.  I tried to use it on Blake when we rolled after.  He of course knew what I was attempting and blocked me.  Even though I was unable to finish the submission I could easily keep the collar and arm to try something else.  Yes, that is me in the black Vulkan (which I will be doing a review on this week).  Chris also demonstrates how after a failed Arm Bar you can then go for a Omoplata.  I’ve been learning that it is always good to have a back up plan.  For those of you more experienced BJJ practitioners this is old news and for the newer like myself its the frontier.  I’m learning to string together multiple submissions in order to guarantee success.

Here is a takedown-to-leg-lock we also went over:

Takedown To Leg Lock Part 1

 

Takedown To Leg Lock Part 2

I didn’t have as much success on this but I did learn something.  You need to choose your takedown in accordance with the size of your opponent.  I’m 6’2", and this isn’t very practical on someone a foot shorter then me.

Jiu-Jitsu is Life and Life is Jiu-Jitsu

Book Review of Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu By Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss

51-RDib6VsL._SL160_ There are some books that should just be standard in every BJJ practitioners library.  They should be well known throughout the community.  For example: Jiu-Jitsu University by Saulo Ribeiro.  So how did I miss Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu: Revolutionizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu by Dave Camarillo with Erich Krauss.  The answer is simple.  I judged the book by its cover.  You know they tell you never to, but I did.  It was named "Guerrilla" and had a bullet hole between the words "Jiu Jitsu".  It didn’t say anything about all the super throws and takedowns in it.  A friend of mine convinced me to look at it and I was astounded.  Where Judo for Mixed Martial Arts: Advanced Throws, Takedowns, and Ground Fighting Techniques shows you no-gi throws and takedowns, Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu shows you gi and more!  Here was the book I had really been looking for.  It even had the Ashi-Barai takedown that I had just learned and was looking for the name of.  This is a Judo for BJJ book like no other.  I went on to see all kinds of flying takedowns.  So some would poo-poo this as just flash.  I say what a great way to catch your opponent off balance.  No one expects a flying attack.  Get a partner, put in the repetitions, and catch them with their pants down.  Judo has superior takedown and throwing technique while BJJ has superior ground fighting technique.  Anyone who wants to excel in BJJ needs to have more then a ground game.  Guerilla Jiu-Jitsu has excellent color photos and good descriptions with each technique.  I am now looking into getting the DVD’s (which once again look silly) Position: Impossible "Guerrilla Jiu Jitsu".  Please a guy in a gi with a pistol?  Dave Camarillo has got the moves just not the marketing skills.  In the mean while I have picked out a few throws to start practicing at class.  My love of the Balloon Sweep should translate nicely into the Tomoe-Nage Armlock that Dave shows in his book.  I’ll have to do a post on it after I prefect it.

The 5 Steps For A Successful Ochi-Gari Takedown

The Ochi-Gari is a great takedown to practice that isn’t to hard on your training partner.  I had a great time doing it last night at class.  Here is a video demonstrating it (Sorry, I had my thumb over the mic).

Ochi-Gari Takedown

I’ve been doing some posts on throws and takedowns because I think it is a weak point in my own game and in most BJJ training.  Some of the posts were:  "Throw, Throw, Throw, again", "Review of Judo Throws and Takedown Books for Jiu-Jitsu", and "Should I Learn Judo To Excel In Jiu-Jitsu".  Here are the 5 steps as I see them in a successful Ochi-Gari.

  1. Grip.  You don’t want to burn your grip.  Even with good Judo hook grips I noticed that at the end of class my hands were shaking.  I hope it isn’t to noticeable in the video after I get it under control.  Think about control without muscle.
  2. Step In.  The first foot should step in but not between the opponents legs.  It should be centered on his body.  The behind step then should move you to flush with your opponent.
  3. Sweep.  The sweep is called a "reap".  It refers to reaping grain.  It is a smooth semi-circle.  It isn’t a chopping motion.  It isn’t placed inside the leg and then hooked.  It reaps in and takes the leg out.  Yes, you can then lift or hook the leg if needed to finish it.
  4. Twist.  The twist using the arms moves his balance.  You want to dictate where his balance is.  If you don’t twist as you sweep, the Ochi-Gari’s effectiveness is greatly reduced.
  5. Capitalize.  The takedown isn’t over until you have the dominate position.  Have a submission or position in mind you are prepared to take after the sweep.

I hope this is helpful.  It helped me memorize this technique by posting it. Thank you to Chris and Miles for being the movie stars of this post.

How To Execute the Single Leg Take Down “Run The Pike”

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I just posted Secrets of The Single Leg Take Down or Shot.  Here is one of the single leg take down finishes that Clint went over called "Run The Pike".  I got most of it but my video recorder filled up and cut off the last.  It has enough of the technique to learn it.  I especially like this technique because I feel it is what BJJ is all about, technique.  Its called a momentum technique Clint says.  You don’t need muscle to do it.  You are just falling away from your opponent.  You are using the weight of your body and gravity to throw the person.  I weigh about 212lb.  My 40lb. 3 year old daughter likes to charge and crash into me.  If I’m not ready for it she can knock me off balance.  If she really blind sides me at the right time she can just about knock me over.  I use this example to illustrate the point that only 40lb. directed correctly can bring you down.  So with little effort a smaller person can use "Run the Pike" to take down a much larger opponent.

Clint simply steps back and drops his body.  It reminds me of going down a spiral stair case.  The dropping and sweeping motion create the technique.  One thing I didn’t include in the videos is that once have them on the ground don’t stop!  You can do a double leg bind for instance and then move to side control.  Check the video:

Single Leg Take Down "Run the Pike" – JiuJitsuMap.com

Secrets of the Single Leg Take Down or Shot

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.    I’ve covered the double leg take down and its finishes.  Now I am going to blog on the single.

Some of the secrets Clint shared with us were:

  1. Your head should always be on the inside when doing a single leg take down.  This keeps the target’s hips in check, avoids being flattened, and the Guillotine.
  2. Hips in and Head Up.  Your posture can make or break this technique.  You need to keep your hips in and your head up to get the power you need and to avoid losing control of the shot.
  3. Keep you target off balance.  Once you have the leg if you keep moving the target around until you get the position you want for the finish he won’t be able to go on the offensive.
  4. Lock the leg to you and not you to the leg.  He show how to hold the leg and at the same time be able to quickly let go or react if needed.

In the video Clint talks about how he doesn’t use the double leg take down against big guys and how the single is easier to recover from if you fail in the shot.  I will continue with posts on the finishes he showed next.

Here is the video:

Secrets To The Single Leg Take Down or Shot

Here are some of the other posts related to this seminar:

  1. Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finish Technique
  2. How to do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

 

How To Do The Double Leg Flare or Cut-Corner Take Down

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  I posted the Hook Leg Take Down as one of the other finishing moves Clint showed us.  The other one was the Flare or Cut-Corner take down.  It was a little more difficult of the the two double leg take downs.  It involves changing your direction of attack.  In the Hook Leg take down you just keep driving forward.  With the Flare or  Cut-Corner take down you change direction half way through.  It also reminds me of the BJJ technique called Baiana.  If you combined a shot with a Baiana you would get the Flare or Cut-Corner in my opinion.  I had a hard time pushing off of my posting leg to do this technique.  I think part of it was in learning I wasn’t doing it full strength.  I needed to have the target off balance for it to work properly.  I apologize for how shaky the video is. After working out for a while and being slammed to the mat a few times it was hard keeping it still.

Here it is on YouTube.com:

 

If you can’t see it please click HERE

The Hook Leg Take Down or Shot Finishing Technique

This is a continuation from my post 6 Steps of The Shot or Take Down from the Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu Jitsu.  Clint continued the seminar with finishing techniques.  One of them was how to finish your take down or shot with the hook leg take down.  This is a finish to use after you have done your follow through.  Clint does a excellent job I think of showing how to really step thorough your target and then follow through with the momentum to get the finish.  He also shows how to continue working for the finish if you don’t get it right off.  I think most BJJ practitioners are weak in this.  I know I am.  Clint even mentions at one point how a typical BJJ guy won’t even need the finishing move if the initial shot or impact is hard enough.   In most cases the target will just fall back and try for guard.  I found it easy to do the hooking motion.  But I noticed for my partner that has more muscle then me it was harder.

I have also included the video on YouTube.com  Here it is:

Hook Leg Take Down

6 Steps Of The Shot or Take Down

Saturday I attended a Free Take Down Seminar at West Side Jiu-Jitsu.  Clint went over a number of things.  I will post each day until I get them all covered.  Today’s post is about the basics of the Shot.  Here are the 6 steps or parts of a shot.  In the video I have included Clint goes over them and explains in more detail.  I will give a synopsis of each step.

  1. Distance – To make a shot you need to be a bent arms length from your target.
  2. Setup – Before making the shot you need to distract or throw off your target.  This is can be done in a number of ways.  The one noted by Clint is just to cause the person to blink by taping their head.  The Setup may also include positioning your self to get ready for the shot.
  3. Level – You should drop down to waist level as you shoot.
  4. Penetration Step – A common drill in BJJ that simulates this is called the “duck walk”.  As you shoot forward you want to moves as if going through them.  This nocks them off balance and gives you control.
  5. Follow Through – This continues the shooting motion.  If you don’t follow through all you have done is stop at their feet.  You are now in a compromised position for a sprawl or to have them take back control on you.
  6. Finish – This the the last move that takes them down.  I will be posting more then one finish we went over.  In this basic example it is simply wrapping the leg that is moving forward from the follow through around the closest leg of the target.  This of course trips them in the case of a double leg take down.

Watch the video with these things in mind and it should help you get more out of it:

If you can’t see the video click HERE to see it on YouTube.com

Free Take Down Seminar From West Side Jiu Jitsu

It seems that the weakest link in most BJJ practitioners arsenal is the take down.  I have to admit that I get a little gun shy when I think of take down practice.  That is after all how I tore my MCL last year.  I was to bull headed and tried to stop my instructor from taking me down.  So when my school offered a free take down seminar this Saturday I decided it was time to get into it.  The best way to improve is to work at something that bothers you until you master it.  I don’t like take downs because I fear injuries.  I get injuries because I’m poor at it.  The good old saying “What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger” is my philosophy.  So I’m going to go to the seminar.  Any of my readers in the area are welcome to join me and meet me in person.  It will be held at 12 – 2pm on Nov. 7th at West Side Jiu Jitsu Academy (2236 Washington Blvd.) in Ogden, UT.  It is being taught by Clint “The Badger” Christensen.  Clint is well known in the area for his expertise.  I understand he fought Matt Hughes to a draw.  It should be good.  I’ll blog later about how it went and what I learned.  I might even have some videos to show.